Home
Videos uploaded by user “Louisiana Channel”
Patti Smith Interview: Advice to the Young
 
06:03
"Build a good name," rock poet Patti Smith advises the young. "Keep your name clean. Don’t make compromises. Don’t worry about making a bunch of money or being successful. Be concerned about doing good work and protect your work." The American singer, poet and photographer Patti Smith (b. 1946) is a living punk rock legend. In this video she gives powerful advice to the young: "Protect your work and if you build a good name, eventually that name will be its own currency. Life is like a roller coaster ride, it is never going to be perfect. It is going to have perfect moments and rough spots, but it’s all worth it." Patti Smith (b.1946) is an award-winning American punk rock musician, poet and visual artist, who became a highly influential figure in the New York City punk rock scene with her debut album ‘Horses’ in 1975. Smith fuses rock and poetry in her work, and has been dubbed the ”punk poet laureate” as well as ”the godmother of punk.” In 2007 she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and in 2010 Rolling Stone magazine put her on the 47th place of their list of 100 Greatest Artists. Among her many albums are ’Horses’ (1975), ’Radio Ethiopia’ (1976), ’Easter’ (1978), ’Gone Again’ (1996) and ’Banga’ (2012). Smith is also the author of several books, including ’Woolgathering’ (1992), ’Just Kids’ (2010) – which won the National Book Award and describes her relationship to her lover and friend, photographer Robert Mapplethorpe – and ’M Train’ (2015). Patti Smith was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Louisiana Literature festival at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark in August 2012. Edited by: Honey Biba Beckerlee Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 640370 Louisiana Channel
8 Artists: Advice to the Young
 
08:36
Watch, listen and soak in the words of 8 prominent artists, who have strong and diverse thoughts on what constitutes insightful advice to young artists. Serbian performance artist Marina Abramovich feels that it is essential to be ready to fail. South African artist William Kentridge believes that good advice has more to do with the interaction between the person giving it and the person receiving it. Rock singer and poet Patti Smith shares the advice that writer William S. Burroughs once gave her: to build and protect your name by producing good work, and eventually the name will become its own currency. American singer David Byrne emphasizes the importance of not undervaluing your own artistic satisfaction. German film director Wim Wenders stresses that you have to do what no one else can do better than you. Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson recommends that you are sensitive to your surroundings - and British artists Dinos and Jake Chapman cut to the bone. For full-length interviews with the above artists and more, have a look here: http://channel.louisiana.dk/search/content/Advice Produced by: Christian Lund Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 347793 Louisiana Channel
Umberto Eco Interview: Advice to the Young
 
01:34
Best-selling Italian novelist Umberto Eco here advises aspiring writers not to take themselves too seriously, but to go step by step and remember that: “You’re 10 per cent inspiration and 90 per cent perspiration.” If you start off thinking that you’re a true genius and that you’ll be receiving the Nobel Prize any moment, you have a problem: “That kills every literary career.” Umberto Eco (b. 1932) is an Italian philosopher, semiotician, essayist, literary critic and author widely known for his bestselling novel ‘The Name of the Rose’ (Il nome della rosa) (1983). Among his other novels are ‘Foucault’s Pendulum’ (Il pendolo di Foucault) (1989), ‘The Island of the Day Before’ (L’isola del giorno prima) (1995), ‘Baudolino’ (2000) and ‘The Prague Cemetery’ (Il cimitero di Praga) (2010). He is the founder of the Department of Media Studies at the University of the Republic of San Marina, President of the Graduate School for the Study of the Humanities, University of Bologna, member of the Accademia dei Lincei and an Honorary Fellow of Kellogg College, University of Oxford. He divides his time between an apartment in Milan and a vacation house near Urbino, Italy – both residences have extensive libraries (30,000 volume and 20,000 volume). For more about him see: http://www.umbertoeco.com/en/ Umberto Eco was interviewed in his apartment in Milan by Tonny Vorm in May 2015. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 77312 Louisiana Channel
Patti Smith Interview: First Encounters with Robert Mapplethorpe
 
10:36
In this interview Patti Smith tells the wonderful story of her first encounters with Robert Mapplethorpe, who became her lover and friend, and who is celebrated in her memoir 'Just Kids'. When Patti Smith shares the story of her first encounters with Robert Mapplethorpe, who was not a famous photographer back then, her feelings are visible to the audience at the Louisiana Literature festival. She also talks about the loss of Robert and calls ‘Just Kids’ a story of unconditional friendship. Patti Smith (b.1946) is an award-winning American punk rock musician, poet and visual artist, who became a highly influential figure in the New York City punk rock scene with her debut album ‘Horses’ in 1975. Smith fuses rock and poetry in her work, and has been dubbed the ”punk poet laureate” as well as ”the godmother of punk.” In 2007 she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and in 2010 Rolling Stone magazine put her on the 47th place of their list of 100 Greatest Artists. Among her many albums are ’Horses’ (1975), ’Radio Ethiopia’ (1976), ’Easter’ (1978), ’Gone Again’ (1996) and ’Banga’ (2012). Smith is also the author of several books, including ’Woolgathering’ (1992), ’Just Kids’ (2010) – which won the National Book Award and describes her relationship to her lover and friend, photographer Robert Mapplethorpe – and ’M Train’ (2015). Patti Smith was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Louisiana Literature festival, at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2012. Edited by: Honey Biba Beckerlee Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2012 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 114964 Louisiana Channel
Laurie Anderson Interview: Advice to the Young
 
04:58
“Be loose!” The legendary multimedia artist, musician and film director Laurie Anderson puts it as simply and clearly as that when she here advises artists to avoid being pressured into limiting themselves artistically. Calling yourself something as “vague” as a multimedia artist – as Anderson does – gives you the freedom to do whatever you want, without having to worry about whether it fits a certain definition: “It’s so easy to get pigeonholed in the art world.” Anderson is aware that sales are a strong underlying factor – “I am a 21st century citizen in a highly corporate world” – but she nonetheless maintains that you should always follow your own interest and obsession: “Whatever makes you feel free and really good – that’s what to do. It’s really simple.” Laurie Anderson (b. 1947) is an internationally renowned experimental performance artist, composer, musician and film director, based in New York. Initially trained as a sculptor, Anderson became widely known outside the art world with her single ‘O Superman’, which reached number two in the UK pop charts in 1981. She is considered a pioneer of electronic music and is praised for her unique spoken word albums and multimedia art pieces. Among her most recent work is the film ‘Heart of a Dog’ (2015). For more about Anderson see: www.laurieanderson.com/ Laurie Anderson was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in May 2016. Camera: Rasmus Quistgaard Edited by: Klaus Elmer Madsen Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 49477 Louisiana Channel
Mark Bradford Interview: Layers of Violence
 
05:24
“I pillage my own work. I tear it down and build it up in traces.” Let us introduce you to American painter Mark Bradford, who doesn’t use traditional paint but material “that has something to do with the social fabric of the times we live in.” “From a distance it looks like paint. As you move closer you begin to realise that it’s not paint, but it’s not actually collage. It’s an amalgamation of materials that cling to the city.” Instead of paint, Bradford uses liquefied paper, which shares similarities with paint. He uses billboard paper from the streets or building material from any building supply store. Instead of “looking in,” which he finds to be typical of modernist painting, Bradford has chosen to “look out.” Bradford feels that his way of working on canvasses is aggressive, even violent: “It’s like tearing into the body. It’s very physical. It’s like if I just took my hand and reached in and pulled out the heart and then yanked it out.” Mark Bradford (b. 1961) is an American painter. One of Bradford’s concerns is improving society with his art as well as through a number of social projects. His work can be found in prominent international venues such as San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, REDCAT in Los Angeles and Saatchi Gallery in London. In 2014 Bradford was presented with the US Department of State’s Medal of Arts. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California. Mark Bradford was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at his studio in Los Angeles, California in January 2016. Camera: Jakob Solbakken Edited by: Miriam Nielsen Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016
Views: 63843 Louisiana Channel
Bjarke Ingels Interview: Advice to the Young
 
08:31
Renowned Danish architect Bjarke Ingels here offers his architectural advice to aspiring architects and explains why architecture is fundamentally important for the world we live in. Bjarke Ingels is considered one of the greatest architects of our time, with projects such as the BIG U, which contains a plan to fortify the whole south tip of Manhattan against future storms and rising sea levels. His architectural vision evolves around a philosophy that could be described as a pragmatic utopianism, combining everyday needs with sustainable solutions to the climatic challenges. We live in the anthropogenic age, where humans don’t adapt to life, but life adapts to human needs, Ingels explains, which makes his advice to young architects designing tomorrow’s world simple and clear. The key for young architects is to acquire the tools and language to comprehend the human needs outside of the architectural bubble, and understand that they are here to accommodate - and not to be accommodated. Bjarke Ingels (born 1974) is a renowned Danish architect and founding partner of BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group located in Copenhagen and New York. In 2013 BIG was chosen to redesign the Smithsonian, the world’s largest museum and research complex in Washington, a project which will be implemented over a period of 20 years. His projects include The Mountain, a residential complex in Copenhagen, and the innovative Danish Maritime Museum in Elsinore. In 2004 he received the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale and the Danish Crown Prince’s Culture Prize in 2011. Moreover, BIG received Architizer’s Firm of the Year Award in 2014. Bjarke Ingels was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg in New York in December 2014. Camera: Pierce Jackson Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 182031 Louisiana Channel
Günter Grass Interview: Facebook is Shit
 
02:12
"Someone who has 500 friends, has no friends." An interview with the Nobel Prize winning author Günter Grass on Facebook, computers and the internet. Writer Günter Grass on why he prefers remaining off line, working the old fashioned way: "Literature for example -- you can't speed it up, when you work with it. If you do, you do so at the expense of quality." Grass also explains how direct experiences and direct contact cannot be replaced by virtual stuff, however appealing it may be. Günter Wilhelm Grass (b.1927) is a German novelist, poet, playwright, illustrator, graphic artist, sculptor, best known for his first novel The Tin Drum (1959). He is widely regarded as Germany's most famous living writer. In 1999 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. Günter Grass was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner Camera: Klaus Elmer Editing: Martin Kogi Produced by Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013. Meet more artists at channel.louisiana.dk Louisiana Channel is a non-profit video channel for the Internet launched by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in November 2012. Each week Louisiana Channel will publish videos about and with artists in visual art, literature, architcture, design etc. Read more: channel.louisiana.dk/about Supported by Nordea-fonden.
Views: 41936 Louisiana Channel
Jonas Mekas: Advice to the Young
 
01:49
The godfather of American avant-garde cinema, filmmaker and poet Jonas Mekas, whom we met in his Brooklyn-home, has a clear piece of advice for aspiring filmmakers: “Don’t go to film school. Get a camera.” If you have the necessary funds, film school is a nice place to meet like-minded people and make friends. Apart from that, it makes more sense to look into the specific things that you take special interest in – such as lenses – rather than to simply study everything: “Why do you need everything? Maybe you’ll never need it for what you want to do.” Jonas Mekas (b. 1922 in Lithuania) is an experimental filmmaker and poet. He has filmed artists such as Andy Warhol and Allen Ginsberg, and his movies include ‘The Brig’ (1963) – which won him the Grand Prize at the Venice Film Festival the same year –, ‘Walden’ (1969), ‘Lost Lost Lost’ (1975), ‘Scenes from the Life of Andy Warhol’ (1990), ‘As I was Moving Ahead I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty’ (2000) and ‘Sleepless Night Stories’ (2011). Since 2000, he has expanded his work into the area of film installations, exhibiting at prominent venues such as the Serpentine Gallery, the Centre Pompidou, Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris, Moderna Museet, PS1 Contemporary Art Center MoMA and the Venice Biennale. Mekas is also responsible for the legendary Movie Journal (from 1958) in the Village Voice, and in 1964 he founded the Filmmakers’ Cinematheque, which eventually grew into Anthology Film Archives, one of the world’s largest and most important repositories of avant-garde cinema and screening venue. Moreover, he is one of the co-founders of New American Cinema Group. Mekas currently lives and works in New York City. For more about him see: www.jonasmekas.com Jonas Mekas was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg in his home in Brooklyn, New York in November 2014. Camera: Pierce Jackson Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 14871 Louisiana Channel
David Shrigley Interview: Advice to the Young
 
05:24
“You’re on the right track if you’re excited about what you’re doing.” Artist David Shrigley, known for his humorous spin on common situations, here advises his young colleagues to be open to learning from mistakes and stresses that being an artist “isn’t for everybody.” Drugs and alcohol should be kept apart from the art making process: “If you’re well-rested, sober and well-fed, you can usually trust your instincts about what you’re doing.” Moreover, it’s important to remember that making art isn’t always fun: “It’s not like eating cake or something that’s really sensually pleasurable. It does require hard work … and you can work hard and still not make art that’s any good.” David Shrigley (b. 1968) is a British visual artist, perhaps best known for his distinctive drawing style and works that make satirical comments on everyday situations and human interactions. Shrigley works across a range of media including large-scale installation, animation, painting, photography, music and sculpture. He has held solo exhibitions at venues such as Stephen Friedman Gallery in London, Galerie Yvon Lambert in Paris, Transmission Gallery in Glasgow and Galleri Nicolai Wallner in Copenhagen, and his works are included in prominent collections internationally, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Art Institute of Chicago and National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne. In 2013, Shrigley was a Turner Prize nominee. He is based in Brighton, England. For more about him see: http://www.davidshrigley.com/ David Shrigley was interviewed by Christian Lund at Galleri Nicolai Wallner, Copenhagen in January 2016 in connection to his exhibition ‘Coloured Works on Paper’. Camera: Simon Weyhe Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016
Views: 41226 Louisiana Channel
David Byrne Interview: When to Resist Technology
 
04:39
"Computers and technology push us in certain directions creatively and we have to know when to resist that". Legendary musician David Byrne known from the band Talking Heads talks about working as an artist in the field of new technology. "To be honest, I don't think the quality of the recording is the most important thing." Says David Byrne and explains how he had moving experiences from listening to a crappy radio, when he was very young, and why he thinks good music should work in every format. Recording and producing decent music is much easier today, because of the technology and software available. The technology "tends to encourage us to record in a certain way." Byrne explains. Regular, repeatable, strict and steady tempos were an ideal in the past, but are maybe not the best thing. We have to know creatively when to resist technology, Byrne says: "Starting without the computer allows me a certain amount of freedom." Also, you cannot control how people choose to listen to your music - it may be on a phone, with crappy speakers - so the music has to work "in whatever format." When Byrne sees people listening to music holding up a phone it makes him wonder: "What kind of music works really well like that?" The Scottish born, award winning musician, David Byrne (b.1952), who was a founding member and principal songwriter in the American New Wave band Talking Heads, has also released numerous solo recordings, and worked across various media, including film, photography, opera, and non-fiction. Live footage from David Byrne & St Vincent at Stratford Music Center, Rockville, MD, Sep. 2012, kindly provided by NPR MUSIC. David Byrne was interviewed by Pernille Jensen at Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, August 2013. Photographed by Nikolaj Jungersen & Martin Kogi Editing by Martin Kogi Music by David Byrne Produced by Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013. Supported by Nordea-fonden.
Views: 104889 Louisiana Channel
Norman Foster Interview: Advice to the Young
 
01:13
Norman Foster, one of the architectural icons of our time, here advises upcoming architects and artists to make sure that what they’re doing is their true desire – if not, they should simply find something else. When you can’t imagine doing anything else, and you would do anything to be able to do it, then you know you’ve made the right decision. From then on it’s a matter of completely immersing yourself in that choice: “You live it every living second of your life.” Norman Robert Foster (b. 1935) is an English architect and designer, who is considered one of the most prolific architects of his generation. He is the founder of Foster and Partners (1967) and responsible for renowned buildings such as London City Hall and Millennium Bridge (London), Reichstag (Berlin), Bilbao Metro, Hearst Tower (New York), Hong Kong International Airport, Beijing Capital International Airport and Apple Spaceship Headquarters (est. 2016). Foster, who is a Fellow of the Chartered Society of Designers and winner of the society’s highest award, The Minerva Medal, has received several awards such as the Pritzker-prize in 1999 (often referred to as the Nobel Prize of architecture), the Stirling Prize in 1998 and 2004, as well as the Aga Khan Award for Architecture – the largest architectural award in the world – for the University of Technology Petronas in Malaysia (2007). He was knighted in 1990, and in 1999 he was created a life peer, as Baron Foster of Thames Bank, of Reddish in the County of Greater Manchester. Norman Foster was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner in his home near Geneva, Switzerland in April 2015. Camera: Mathias Nyholm Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 41075 Louisiana Channel
Tomas Tranströmer Interview: "The Music Says Freedom Exists"
 
01:47
We visited the Nobel Prize laureate Tomas Tranströmer in his home in Stockholm a few weeks before he passed away, in March 2015. This video with Tranströmer playing the piano to an earlier reading of his poem 'Allegro', became his last public appearance. When we visited him, the poet offered to play a piece of music for the camera. In this video we hear the voice of Tomas Tranströmer reading ‘Allegro’, one of his most famous poems related to music. The poet played the piano ever since his adolescence, around the same time as he began writing poetry. Music plays an essential role in all his poetry. Tranströmer received the Nobel Prize in 2011 “… because, through his condensed, translucent images, he gives us fresh access to reality”. Tranströmer’s work is closely connected to Nature, and this imagery runs through his poems like gaudy colours. His style is described as “original and sharply contoured metaphors, nature mysticism, musicality, strictness of form and natural diction.” The poem ‘Allegro' is from the collection 'Den halvfärdiga himlen' (‘The Half-Finished Heaven’), written in 1962: “I play Haydn after a black day and feel a simple warmth in my hands. The keys are willing. Soft hammers strike. The resonance green, lively and calm. The music says freedom exists and someone doesn't pay the emperor tax. I push down my hands in my Haydnpockets and imitate a person looking on the world calmly. I hoist the Haydnflag - it signifies: “We don't give in. But want peace.” The music is a glass-house on the slope where the stones fly, the stones roll. And the stones roll right through but each pane stays whole." (Translated by Robin Fulton, New Collected Poems, Bloodaxe Books, 1997/2011) Tomas Tranströmer (1931-2015) is regarded as the leading Swedish poet of his generation even though his collected poems can be contained in one volume of only a couple of hundred pages. ‘17 dikter’ 1954 ('17 Poems’), ‘Östersjöar’, 1974 (‘Baltics’, 1980), ‘Mörkerseende’, 1970 ('Night Vision', 1972), and ‘Sanningsbarriären’, 1978 (‘Truth Barriers’, 1984) are among his most important collections of poetry. Tomas Tranströmer received the Nordic Council Literature Prize in 1990, the Swedish Academy Nordic Prize in 1991, the Griffin Lifetime Recognition Award (Canada) in 2007, and the Nobel Prize in 2011. Learn more about Tomas Tranströmer via these links: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2011/transtr... http://tomastranstromer.net/ The recording of 'Allegro' was done in the 1980s and is available on a cd published in 2002 by Bonnier Audio in Stockholm. The photo of the young Tranströmer in the video is taken by Lutfi Özkök, probably in the 1950s when the poet published his first collection of poetry. Christian Lund met Tomas Tranströmer at his home in Stockholm, Sweden in February 2015. Camera: Kasper Kiertzner Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-Fonden
Views: 15412 Louisiana Channel
Lydia Davis Interview: Advice to the Young
 
02:53
“Be patient – even with chaos.” Let American author, Lydia Davis, guide you through the insecurities and literary wilderness that upcoming writers often face. As a writer, Lydia Davis finds it important to never cave in to the pressure of publishers or agents: “Do what you want to do, and don’t worry if it's a little odd or doesn’t fit the market.” Writing isn’t neat – quite the contrary – and it’s necessary to put effort into making the text flow: “You learn from models, you study them, you analyse them very closely. What kind of adjectives, how many, what kind of nouns, how long are the sentences, what’s the rhythm? You pick it apart.” Lydia Davis (b. 1947) is considered “the master of form largely of her own invention.” She has written several collections of short stories, e.g. ‘Break It Down’ (1986), ‘Varieties of Disturbance’ (2007) and ‘Can’t and Won’t’ (2014). When Davis received the Man Booker International Prize in 2013, the chairman of the judges said that “her writings fling their lithe arms wide to embrace many a kind. Just how to categorize them? They have been called stories but could equally be miniatures, anecdotes, essays, jokes, parables, fables, texts, aphorisms or even apophthegms, prayers or simply observations.” Davis is also an acclaimed translator of French writers such as Proust, Gustave Flaubert and Maurice Blanchot. American novelist Jonathan Franzen has characterized Lydia Davis thus: “She is the shorter Proust among us. She has the sensitivity to track the stuff that is so evanescent it flies right by the rest of us. But as it does so, it leaves enough of a trace that when you read her you do it with a sense of recognition.” Lydia Davis was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Louisiana Literature festival at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2014. Camera: Klaus Elmer & Nikolaj Jungersen Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 11103 Louisiana Channel
William Basinski Interview: Bubbles of Eternity
 
05:58
Breathe, listen and float away in one of composer William Basinski's timeless amniotic bubbles. Let your dreams lead the way, or as Basinski puts it: "Sometimes we all need to take a chill pill." Interview with American artist William Basinski (b.1958) about his work, and why he feels we all need to turn off the email and the cell phone, and find our way into a meditative listening mood. Basinksi explains how he works as an artist, and defines his music as "experimental, electronic, ambient music" based on obsolete technology. Basinski makes analogue tape loops with no beginning or end, thus creating "a timeless amniotic bubble that you can float in." He also talks of his live performances, explaining that he is extremely concentrated on listening intensely to the music, the room and the resonance, while feeling the crowd: "The tendency when you are under pressure like that, is to try and do too much, but you have to fight that tendency, in order to listen" he adds. William Basinski is a classically trained musician and composer who has been working in experimental media for over 30 years. His 4-disc masterwork 'The Disintegration Loops' from 2004 received international critical acclaim. Installations and films made in collaboration with artist-filmmaker James Elaine have been presented in festivals and museums internationally, and Basinksi has recently created music for the Robert Wilson opera 'The Life and Death of Marina Abramovic' which toured Europe in 2012 and North America in 2013. William Basinksi was interviewed by Alexander Vesterlund at CLICK festival, Helsingør, Denmark, May 2013. Photographer: Klaus Elmer Editing by Kamilla Bruus Music by William Basinski Copyright: Louisiana Channel, 2013 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 33902 Louisiana Channel
Olafur Eliasson Interview: Advice to the Young
 
02:13
“Artists should have confidence in the fact that making a drawing is changing the world.” Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson, here presents his strong and personal advice to young artists. “Making art is making the world”, Eliasson continues, stressing his point that art should not be marginalized, as art is not fragile, but quite the opposite: “Working with art is working with something that is very fierce, very strong and very robust.” Artists should be very sensitive to their surroundings and the context in which they find themselves. They should, however, also stay true to themselves and make sure that the strong market and its attractiveness does not commercialize them. Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) works with sculpture, painting, photography, film and installations. He grew up in Iceland and Denmark and studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine arts from 1989-1995. In 1995 he moved to Berlin where he founded Studio Olafur Eliasson. Eliasson is behind many major exhibitions and projects around the world, such as ‘The Weather Project’ at Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2003, ‘Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson’ organized by SFMOMA in 2007, which travelled until 2010 to major venues such the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and ‘Riverbed’ at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Among Eliasson’s projects in public space are ‘Green River’, carried out in various cities from 1998-2001 and ‘The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion’ in 2007 in collaboration with Kjetil Thorsen of Snøhetta. He lives and works in Copenhagen and Berlin. Olafur Eliasson was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2014 Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 10512 Louisiana Channel
Cecily Brown Interview: Take No Prisoners
 
16:05
Cecily Brown is considered a central figure in the resurgence of painting at the turn of the century. We met the praised British painter at her New York studio for a talk about borrowing imagery from other artists, and how she has always responded to dark, scary art. “Art was something that seemed very glamorous and dangerous to me as a child.” Brown nurtured an early fascination with the “scary” art, such as Francis Bacon, and would rummage her parents’ art books for the very darkest pictures, such as a particular painting by George Grosz of a butcher shop with human meat in it: “I had sneak looks at it, like you might look at Playboy or something.” Brown, who had been painting naked women for several years, felt an urge to move on to painting men and boys. The painting ‘Young Spartans Exercising’ by Edgar Degas (1860) helped her move on to this: “Lots of artists are like magpies, where you steal or you take or you borrow what you need from somebody. But then obviously – and hopefully – it gets transformed.” This is characteristic of how Brown draws inspiration from her favourite painters and paintings, absorbing and changing images and ultimately making them her own. “The element of surprise has to be there.” Brown prefers to “contradict” herself, and to push her paintings to a degree where she actually risks losing something good. She sums up this approach by quoting her friend, German painter Charlene von Heyl: “Take no prisoners.” Cecily Brown (b. 1969) is a British painter. Brown creates vivid, atmospheric depictions of fragmented bodies, often in erotic positions in the midst of swells of colour and movement. This has made many compare her to painters such as Francis Bacon and Francisco Goya, and she is furthermore credited as a central figure in the resurgence of painting at the turn of the millennium. Brown has exhibited extensively, including at The Saatchi Gallery in London and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. Solo shows have also been held at prominent venues such as Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills, New York and London, Contemporary Fine Arts in Berlin and Kunsthalle in Mannheim. She lives and works in New York City. Cecily Brown was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg in her studio in New York City in November 2014. Camera: Pierce Jackson Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 104602 Louisiana Channel
Lawrence Weiner Interview: The Means to Answer Questions
 
12:30
An interview with the legendary conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner about the connection between cruelty, hierarchy and rationality. The artist must ask questions past ordinary logic, he says. In this interview Weiner philosophises on how the artist can present things people might not have noticed. Art is not meant to answer questions, but rather to ask them. Art is about things you don't know. Art is a means to answer questions. The artist must go beyond logic and risk madness, he explains: "You have to re-adapt your own logic just to be able to communicate with somebody else." The artist must communicate a kind of "what if?" past the point of understandable logic, Weiner says: "Does each rock have a place in the sun?" Art is not telling, but showing. If you take away hierarchy there will be no racism. Cruelty is only possible because people find ways to rationalise it: "I wish people would stop being so cruel to each other." Because of this Weiner wants to "fuck peoples lives up" in the kindest way possible. American artist Lawrence Weiner (b.1942) is regarded as a founding figure of Postminimalism's Conceptual arm in the 1960s. His work often takes the form of typographic texts. He lives and works in New York. Lawrence Weiner was interviewed by Jesper Bundgaard Photography and editing by Per Henriksen Produced by Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 43575 Louisiana Channel
Joshua Oppenheimer Interview: Advice to the Young
 
03:30
“Don’t listen to anyone who tells you how it should be done.” The commended American director Joshua Oppenheimer – nominated twice for an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature – here shares his powerful advice for aspiring filmmakers. Oppenheimer continues by arguing that you should, however, take as much advice as you can from people, who understand your vision – don’t simply keep it to yourself: “You as a filmmaker need to communicate your vision to everyone you work with.” Dig deep into what it is that fascinates you, and explore that story – the element of exploration is what it’s all about: “If you know the story before you start, you shouldn’t make the film.” Joshua Oppenheimer (b. 1974) is an American producer and director, who has studied at Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts as well as Central Saint Martins in London. Oppenheimer has been Oscar-nominated twice – for ‘The Act of Killing’ (2012) and ‘The Look of Silence’ (2014). For these two documentaries he has furthermore received several prestigious awards including a Panorama Audience Award, the European Film Award for Best Documentary, a Robert Award, a BAFTA for Best Documentary, the Grand Jury Prize at the 71st Venice International Film Festival and the International Film Critics Award (FIPRESCI). Other movies include ‘The Globalization Tapes’ (2003) and ‘The Entire History of the Louisiana Purchase’ (1998). He lives in Copenhagen, Denmark. Joshua Oppenheimer was interviewed by Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærksen at Cinemateket in Copenhagen, Denmark in April 2016. Camera: Simon Weyhe Produced and edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016
Views: 7770 Louisiana Channel
Nils Frahm: Live in Concert
 
22:49
Take a joyful ride into the magical music world of German Nils Frahm, in this intimate live concert recording of his works on piano and synthesizer. German musician, composer and pianist Nils Frahm (born 1982) works from his Berlin-based Durton Studio, creating glitchy electronica as well as modern-classical pieces. Frahm has worked and collaborated with many contemporaries such as Peter Broderick, Ólafur Arnalds, Anne Müller, Deaf Center, Efterklang and Dustin O'Halloran. His unconventional approach to an age-old instrument, played contemplatively and intimately, has won him many fans around the world, including Thom Yorke, who featured one of Nils' songs in Radiohead's HQ office chart. Recorded at The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, as part of the FROST music festival, Copenhagen, February 2013. Cameras: Stéphan Aubé, Stefan Larsen and Christian Lund Edit: Stéphan Aubé and Kamilla Bruus Grading: Honey Beckerlee Music by Nils Frahm.
Views: 218375 Louisiana Channel
Tara Donovan Interview: Sculpting Everyday Materials
 
04:22
Everyday materials like drinking straws, tooth pics and needle pins are elements used by American artist Tara Donovan, when she creates her amazing sculptural works: "Inspiration is a joke, real artists sit down and work" Donovan says. Tara Donovan (b. 1969) is fascinated by everyday materials, which she turns into sculptures. She regards herself as a kind of scientist, investigating the potential of different materials, transforming and shaping them, making them transcend themselves and turning them into holistic Gestalten of their own. The element of light plays an important role in Donovan's artworks, as her materials take light in and reflect it different ways. “My sculptures become activated by the movement of the observer” Donovan says. Her works vary in size, depending on the surrounding architecture and the size of the room, they are shown in. She goes on to explain how the magic happens within the sculptures, underlining that her sculptures are artworks rather than critical comments. “I feel like my work is mimicking the ways of nature, not necessarily mimicking nature per ce.” Donovan states. In the video we hear the voice of Tara Donovan, who doesn't like to be filmed. Her works are exhibited for the first time in Europe in February 2013 at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. Tara Donovan was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. Camera: Mathias Nyholm Produced by: Mathias Nyholm and Marc-Christoph Wagner Music by: Trentemøller. Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013 Supported by Nordea-fonden.
Views: 11077 Louisiana Channel
Chimamanda Adichie: Beauty Does Not Solve Problems
 
15:12
I am drawn to the beauty of sentences, Nigerian writer Chimamanda Adichie confesses in this interview. Nevertheless it is important to keep a distance to your characters. Chimamanda Adichie (b. 1977) discovered literature at a very early age. "I started reading and writing at the same time", she says in this conversation. "If the writing is going well, it is almost transcendent. Then it is a state of being." Adichie explains, that she is drawn to melancholy: "Both in people, stories and music I find it very beautiful." At the same time, Adichie distances herself from pure emotional literature. "People tend to think, that if a book supports your own prejudices, it's great literature. It's not. As a writer, you have to keep a distance to your subject. And in general, the definition of beauty in the western world is very narrow." Adichie grew up in the southeastern part of Nigeria. After school, she studied medicine and pharmacy at the University of Nigera. At the age of 19, Adichie left Nigeria and moved to the United States for college, where she studied communications and political science in Philadelphia. In 2003, she completed a master's degree in creative writing at the Johns Hopkins University. In 2008, she received a Master of Arts degree in African studies from Yale University. Adichie has received numerous prices for her literary work, including the novels Purple Hibiscus (2003) and Half of a yellow sun (2007) as well as the collection of short stories The Thing Around Your Neck (2009). Her latest novel Americanah (2013) was selected by the New York Times as one of The 10 Best Books of 2013. Chimama Adichie was interviewed by Synne Rifbjerg. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edit: Kamilla Bruus Produced by Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 250986 Louisiana Channel
Daniel Lanois Interview: Advice to the Young
 
05:21
“Should one be so lucky to find something they are good at, then pursue it with full passion, man.” Spot-on advice from one of the world’s most sought-after producers Daniel Lanois, who forwards wisdom from the legendary Brian Eno. To be “a master of a few things” seems to be a key element in Daniel Lanois’ musical landscape. When he worked with Brian Eno in the 1980s they sought to become experts at a few specific things, and their field of expertise soon came to be the boxes in which they created their characteristic ambient soundscapes. This strong and early sense of direction is what he considers the foundation for his success as one of the greatest music producers of our time: “I find people wait too long to get into things.” Daniel Lanois (b. 1951) is a legendary Canadian music producer, guitarist, vocalist and songwriter. He has received three Grammy Awards for Album of the Year as well as several nominations. Among the albums he has produced are U2’s ‘The Joshua Tree’, Bob Dylan’s ‘Time Out of Mind’ and Peter Gabriel’s ‘So’. As a musician he has invented the legendary ‘ambient records’ such as ‘The Plateaux of Mirror’, ‘Apollo’, ‘On Land’ and ‘The Pearl’ in collaboration with Brian Eno. Daniel Lanois was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg at Musikhuset Posten in Odense, Denmark in April 2015. Camera: Nikolaj Jungersen Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 24114 Louisiana Channel
Kerry James Marshall Interview: Paint it Black
 
10:19
Imagine being seen for who you really are, a central figure in narration. In this powerful interview American artist Kerry James Marshall talks about how he explores the presence and absence of the black figure in art history. "We live in a material world, in which the things we see shape our expectations." Meet artist Kerry James Marshall in this interview about his development as an artist, where he explains that he wishes to help make equality a reality by placing the black figure in the center of the painting. Marshall also talks about how growing up as a witness to movements and riots shaped his perception of the world, and how he found that art should be embedded in the political reality, and that as a painter he should work with social transformation. Black invisibility is a psychological issue, Marshall says. It means that people do not want to see you in the fullness of who you are: "Reading The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison really is what set up this exploration, for me, of this simultaneous capacity of being and not being." As an artist Marshall has explored this idea of invisibility and visibility, presence and absence through the use of different shades of black on black, working with political events and historical figures, as well as reworking classic works of art from art history with black bodies and figures: "It's one thing to stand by and admire the work of other people, the moment that I recognize the greatness of those things it's unacceptable to me to not also try to match the sophistication and complexity and the appeal of those works, but doing it with images that have people who look like me in them." Kerry James Marshall (b.1955) is known for his large-scale paintings, sculptures, and other objects that take African-American life and history as their subject matter. His work often deals with the effects of the Civil Rights movement on domestic life, in addition to working with elements of popular culture. Marshall graduated from Otis College of Art and Design in 1978. Kerry James Marshall was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Denmark, 2014. Camera: Mathias Nyholm Edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 12733 Louisiana Channel
Anselm Kiefer Interview: Art is Spiritual
 
12:41
Meet the extolled German artist, Anselm Kiefer, who lives for the process of creating, argues that history is a moldable material, considers art a spiritual occupation and refers to himself as a “dinosaur”. Art is a spiritual occupation, capturing a form of contact that science can’t: “It makes a connection between things that are separated,” Kiefer argues. In his mind, his works should continually evolve and be fluid. The process of creating is of utmost importance to him, as it is the process rather than the end that has his interest, and what’s between the paintings rather than in them. “I am a dinosaur – I paint myself,” he comments. Kiefer argues that history is a material, which is moldable like argil, and in this way becomes less horrific as it is possible to reform it. “History shows that humankind has a wrong construction in their head…it’s badly done,” he continues, half-jokingly remarking that if an airplane had such a construction, it would fall down all the time. He, however, does not consider it his job as an artist to express a certain attitude towards history: “I just show it like I see it.” Anselm Kiefer (born 1945) is a German painter and sculptor. His works incorporate materials such as straw, ash, clay, lead and shellac. Spirituality and history are important themes in Kiefer’s works, which frequently address and seek to process taboo and often dark, controversial issues from recent history, such as the horrors of the Holocaust. Kiefer, whose style is often linked to ‘New Symbolism’, lives and works primarily in Paris, France and in Alcáder do Sal, Portugal. Anselm Kiefer was interviewed by Tim Marlow at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in 2010. Camera: Marie Friis Forchhammer Edited by: Marie Friis Forchhammer Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 90361 Louisiana Channel
11 Writers: Advice to the Young
 
11:23
What would some of the greatest writers of our time advise their younger peers? Find out here where Jonathan Franzen, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Richard Ford, Umberto Eco and seven others share their thoughts on how to make it as a writer. “Have fun … if you’re having fun there’s a good chance that the reader will too,” is American Jonathan Franzen’s (b. 1959) most important piece of advice. Swedish playwright Lars Norén (b. 1944) argues that writing isn’t about desire, but about necessity: “… the disappointments and the efforts are so tough that you must have an inner conviction that this is what you want.” “Write, write, write and write again, and you will get it right.” Such is the key piece of advice from Kenyan writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o (b. 1938). American Lydia Davis (b.1947) emphasizes how important it is accept that writing can be chaotic and to put effort into making the text flow: “You learn from models, you study them, you analyse them very closely … You pick it apart.” Remember what excited you when you were at your most impressionable, says Icelandic Sjón (b. 1962), who also urges young writers not to be embarrassed by what initially inspired you: “All of us come to culture through trash.” ”Build a good name,” is American rock poet Patti Smith’s (b. 1946) powerful advice, which she herself was given by legendary writer and poet William S. Burroughs: ”If you build a good name, eventually that name will be its own currency.” Italian Umberto Eco (b. 1932) advises aspiring writers not to take themselves too seriously, and to remember that: “You’re 10 per cent inspiration and 90 per cent perspiration.” “If you’re not talented, you shouldn’t write.” Egyptian novelist Alaa al-Aswany (b. 1957) puts it as simply as that. However, if you do have talent, you can only make a difference if writing is truly the most important thing in your life. Norwegian Herbjørg Wassmo (b. 1942) is unambiguous in her advice to aspiring writers when she states that it quite simply takes hard work and persistence to achieve your goals: “Write, write, write!” Becoming a writer isn’t something you should aspire to be, according to American Richard Ford (b. 1944). Making it as a writer is “a long shot,” but if you can’t talk yourself out of it, then maybe it really is your vocation. Norwegian Kjell Askildsen (b. 1929) turns things around and argues that one simply shouldn’t take advice from anyone but rather listen to the books you love. Interviews by Kim Skotte, Anette Dina Sørensen, Bjørn Bredal, Tonny Vorm, Marc-Christoph Wagner, Christian Lund and Kasper Bech Dyg. For full length interviews see: http://channel.louisiana.dk/topics/literature Produced by: Christian Lund Edited by: Klaus Elmer Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016
Views: 85691 Louisiana Channel
George Condo Interview: Advice to the Young
 
01:54
“Work first and think second.” Get advice from an artist who mixes American pop culture with references to art history – George Condo. In this short video he encourages his colleagues to embrace the freedom that comes with being an artist. Condo advises young artists to look at a lot of art: “My experience was that the more you know about art, the more you look at art as a young artist, the more you see how great it is. And the more you feel how great it is, the more you feel like you want to be part of that greatness.” “To learn how to do it, you can just start by doing it.” Artists shouldn’t overthink what they’re doing. There are no rules in art, and artists are in “one of those beautiful places in the world,” where they don’t have any restrictions, which is quite exceptional: “There isn’t a methodology that’s ever happened in art that was knocked down, if it was any good.” George Condo (b. 1957) is an American contemporary visual artist working in the mediums of painting, drawing, sculpture and printmaking. Condo mixes input from art history’s masters – such as Velasquez, Manet and Picasso – with elements of American Pop Art. He distorts and renews this material so that it stands out and becomes his own: a kind of strange hybrid that blurs boundaries between the comic and the tragic, the grotesque and the beautiful, the classic and the innovative. As part of the wild art scene in New York in the early 1980s, Condo was close to painters such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, and worked for Andy Warhol’s Factory, applying diamond dust to silkscreen. Condo’s work is in the permanent collections of MoMA, the Whitney Museum, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Broad Foundation in Los Angeles, Tate Gallery in London, Centre George Pompidou in Paris and Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art in Oslo, among others. He is the recipient of an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1999) and the Francis J. Greenberger Award (2005). Condo lives and works in New York City. George Condo was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg at his studio in Soho, New York City in September 2017. Camera: Jakob Solbakken Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2017 Supported by Nordea-fonden FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 4976 Louisiana Channel
Michael Simpson Interview: Advice to the Young
 
02:58
“Don’t be afraid of the history of art.” We had the pleasure of meeting painter Michael Simpson in his studio. He here shares his solid piece of advice for young artists, who should learn from the history of art rather than dismiss it as something outdated. Simpson feels that being an art student is in a sense “a false playground,” where you get lots of feedback and support. The big test of whether or not you can become an artist comes when you leave art school: “You suddenly find yourself in a room on your own, and it’s essentially hermetic, this activity. You’re suddenly involved in nothing more than a monologue with yourself. And it’s dangerous and it’s really, really difficult.” Michael Simpson (b. 1940) is a British painter born to a Russian Jewish mother and a Roman gypsy father. Simpson has been working on a series of large paintings relating to the same atheist theme since 1989: ‘Bench paintings’. Although this work – which originates in his intense interest in the infamy of religious history and in particular to the renegade medieval philosopher Giordano Bruno – is contemporary, its main influences originate from 15th century Venetian and early Flemish painting. Simpson’s first solo show was at Piccadilly Gallery in 1964, and he has since exhibited continuously including solo shows at Arnolfini in Bristol, David Risley Gallery in Copenhagen and Serpentine Gallery in London. He lives and works in Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire in England. Michael Simpson was interviewed by Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen in his studio space – a former gas works – in Wiltshire, England in February 2016. Please note that the painting shown in the background is an unfinished work by the painter. Camera: Kyle Stevenson Produced and edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016
Views: 5708 Louisiana Channel
Ed Ruscha Interview: Words Have No Size
 
13:49
The road to being an artist was “like blind leading the blind” says Ed Ruscha, who grew to be one of the most recognised American artists of the 20th century. Hear the story of West Coast Jazz, his break with abstract art and L.A. in the 1960s. When Ed Ruscha entered the Los Angeles art scene in the 1960s the city was buzzing with progressive jazz and the prevailing method of making art was abstract expressionism. But the intuitive style did not fit Ruscha’s temperament: “I had to preconceive ideas that I would put into a picture.” The big creative breakthrough came when the artist stepped away from abstraction and began working with recognisable objects, particularly words. “Words were not tied to any particular size,” Ruscha explains. “If you see a picture of an apple you know its size, but a word has no size.” The use of everyday objects and words was general for the generation of Pop Artists with which Ruscha has often been grouped. The young artists of the era found abstract expressionism and minimalism exhausted. “These genres had been so well stated that it would be difficult to state anything more. It was a natural evolution to move in different directions,” says Ruscha. “I’m one of those artists who saw that common objects had more appeal to me than throwing paint at a canvas.” Ed Ruscha (b. 1937) is an American painter, photographer and filmmaker. Considered a central figure in post-war American art, his work has been the subject of retrospective New York, Washington, D.C., London, Paris, and Munich and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2001. Ed Ruscha was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at his studio in Los Angeles, USA in January 2016. Camera: Jakob Solbakken Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum for Modern Art Supported by Nordea-fonden FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 35531 Louisiana Channel
Father John Misty Interview: Elements of Misdirection
 
12:56
Hear the story of a successful American singer-songwriter, who grew up in a religious home that he had to break radically with. Meet Joshua Tillman who became Father John Misty, and who has made roleplaying the axis of his captivating songs. “There are a lot of ways where the rhetoric of being an artist or a musician overlaps with the rhetoric of faith or religion,” says Misty. Growing up in a strict Protestant Evangelical home in suburban Maryland, U.S. – where only Christian culture was permitted – he explains that the fantasy world he has created is similar to the religious world in which he was raised. Unhappy with his background, the American songwriter felt a strong desire to break with it completely and re-invent himself. The ultimate way of doing so was by changing his name. Several albums were thus produced under the name J. Tillman and were – in Misty’s own words – “cathartic.” Around the age of 30, he had a “creative pre-mature midlife crisis,” which made him realize that in order to survive creatively he had to keep moving. As a response, Father John Misty was created: “Any time you get on stage there’s something inauthentic happening. At worst something inauthentic. And at the most benign you are like an object to people and they’re animating who you are with their own perceptions and whatever else.” Creating the character of Father John Misty then also became a way for him to be “authentically fake.” Joshua Tillman (Father John Misty) (b. 1981) is an American singer, guitarist, drummer and songwriter. He started out doing solo albums under the name J. Tillman from age 21 and later went on to play drums in the critically acclaimed folk-band Fleet Foxes (2008-2012). In 2012 Tillman released his first album as Father John Misty called ‘Fear Fun’. His second album ‘I Love You, Honeybear’ was released in 2014 and received excellent reviews from the likes of The Guardian, SPIN and Pitchfork. Father John Misty was interviewed by Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen at the music venue Vega in Copenhagen, Denmark in November 2015 in connection to his concert. Clips from the concert are featured during the video. Camera: Simon Weyhe and Klaus Elmer Produced and edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 61525 Louisiana Channel
Zadie Smith Interview: On Shame, Rage and Writing
 
17:25
“Writing is all shame.” Zadie Smith – often referred to as “the superstar of British literature” – here talks about how shame can be used to “propel you on to something,” and why one must try to understand where people’s rage is coming from. On the subject of ‘shame’, Smith feels that there is a positive element to it, as being shameless is very dangerous: “In America, our president at the moment is a shameless person.” She finds that shame can even be productive and that writing is an entirely shameful practice: “Who are you to write 400 pages about anything? Why should anybody have to read them? Every moment of it is shameful.” In continuation of this, revisiting your early work isn’t an easy thing for her: “It always feels quite distant, partly because when you’re writing it’s such an obsessive thing, and then when you’re done it’s like pushing something out of your body you don’t want to be involved with anymore.” Moreover, as “writing is wonderfully solitary” and many writers are quite introvert, it is the act of performing that prevents them from excelling in other things that they may be good at: “I think writing gives the most possibility of improvement. I was never going to be Stevie Wonder, no matter how hard I tried, but with writing you can get better.” Smith argues that it is important to try to understand how the rage of the right-wing increased during the eight years, where they were the ones with a president they couldn’t relate to: “I think you have to think of emotions as real even when they’re extremely alien to you.” Rather than being overwhelmed with anger at extreme opinions, one must try to conceive of it: “I feel the rage, but my rage matching their rage is pointless. I think it’s more interesting to think about what it is about white people that find the idea of any collectivity that excludes them so upsetting.” Smith finds that insecurity, jealousy and “a kind of vanity that you should always be included in all things” are at the root of this rage. But it’s okay if things aren’t necessarily about you: “Why do you turn that moment of mystery, where you’re not sure what’s going on, immediately into rage?” Zadie Smith (b. 1975) is a British novelist, essayist and short story writer. She is the author of the critically praised novels ‘White Teeth’ (2000), ‘The Autograph Man’ (2002), ‘On Beauty’ (2005), ‘NW’ (2012) and ‘Swing Time’ (2016). Smith is the recipient of prestigious awards such as the Whitbread First Novel Award and the Guardian First Book Award for ‘White Teeth’, ‘Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists’ (2003 and 2013), ‘Welt-Literaturpreis’ (2016) and the ‘Langston Hughes Medal’ (2017). She lives in New York City. Zadie Smith was interviewed by Synne Rifbjerg in August 2017 in connection with the Louisiana Literature festival in Denmark. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2018 Supported by Nordea-fonden FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 65581 Louisiana Channel
Yayoi Kusama Interview: Advice to the Young
 
01:43
What piece of advice would one of the world’s most iconic contemporary artists pass on? Japanese Yayoi Kusama here turns the tables and argues that advice should not come from other people: “I am not an art teacher to you.” “Spread your ideas all over the world.” Kusama encourages artists to trust their own creativity, explore themselves and discover their own path in life: “A true direction will come from overcoming adversity.” Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929) is a Japanese artist and writer. She has worked in a wide variety of media, including paintings, collage, sculpture, performance art, fashion, and installations. Common for these different genres is the thematic interest in psychedelic colours, repetition and pattern (most famously dots). She moved to the United States in 1957 and soon became a fixture of the New York avant-garde scene, influencing contemporary artists such as Andy Warhol. It was also in New York, that she embraced the rise of the hippie counterculture of the late 1960s, organizing a series of happenings in which naked participants were painted with polka dots. In 1973 Kusama moved back to Japan, where she was suddenly perceived as a “Western” artist, and thus had to re-establish her network and position. Kusama’s work is in the collections of leading museums such as MoMA in New York, Tate Modern in London, Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Centre Pompidou in Paris and the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo. She has received numerous prestigious awards, including the Asahi Prize (2001), Order des Arts et des Lettres (2003), the Order of the Rising Sun (2006) and one of Japan’s most prestigious prizes, Praemium Imperiale (2006), which she was the first Japanese woman to receive. Kusama has also designed for the fashion-industry, collaborating with prominent designers such as Louis Vuitton. She lives and works in Tokyo, Japan. Yayoi Kusama was interviewed at her studio in Tokyo, Japan in June 2015. Camera: Yudai Maruyama Produced and edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 37814 Louisiana Channel
David Hockney Interview: I Am a Space Freak
 
15:35
“My sister once said to me she thought space was God. I thought that was rather poetic in a way.” Interview with David Hockney about his endeavour to capture Grand Canyon as a spatial experience in a painting. “We like space, I mean, I do, I’m a space freak really.” If a landscape is a spatial experience, then how do you capture it as an artist? The grand canyon is the world greatest hole, thrilling to look down into it, no focus, no centre, no focal point: “The grandeur of it is very difficult to capture.” David Hockney decided to take on the unphotographable, and drove to the Grand Canyon thinking he would make a photographic collage. Once he saw the prints, he was displeased with the result, as they seemed too flat, he explains. That is why he decided to paint it in stead. Hockney did two large scale paintings of Grand Canyon, the first one was based on the photographs, while the second one, 'A Closer Grand Canyon' seen in this interview, was painted from drawings which he made while staying in a hotel right by the edge of the canyon. Cameras make things distant, Hockney says. He also talks of why he decided to work with small canvases, and the problems of both moving and displaying large works of art. Finally Hockney contemplates cinema and 3D and why to him even that is a flat experience. Two dimensions don´t exist in nature, Hockney says - flatness is to do with human scale: “I’m rather fascinated with flatness.” Today he is working with many cameras simultaniously, because they create illusion of space, via many perspectives. Really we create space in our head, based on time, Hockney adds. To have the feeling of space, a person must be looking around, freely. Nine camera perspectives means you are forced to move around, constantly scanning the scenery: “9D, isn’t that three times better than 3D?” English artist David Hockney, (b.1937) studied at the Royal College of Art where in 1960 he was featured in the exhibition Young Contemporaries that announced the arrival of British Pop art. He was associated with the movement, but his early works display expressionist elements, not dissimilar to some works by Francis Bacon. Hockney has homes in Yorkshire, London and Los Angeles and an office in Hollywood. In the early 1980s, Hockney began to produce photo collages, which he called "joiners," first using Polaroid prints and subsequently 35mm, commercially-processed color prints. Using Polaroid snaps or lab-prints of a single subject, Hockney arranged a patchwork to make a composite image. David Hockney was interviewed by Christian Lund, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2011 Camera and edit by: Martin Kogi Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2012 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 51164 Louisiana Channel
Adam Caruso: Novelty is nonsense
 
16:13
"The European city is one of the great human inventions!” Adam Caruso advocates building with a deep sense of history and tradition. Meet the architect behind the award-winning Tate Britain conversion and numerous Gagosian galleries around the world. For Adam Caruso architecture is a cultural practice, a question of making buildings that are connected to the history of architecture and “a deeper idea of place, of the history and culture of the place and how you read it today.” His style contrasts many contemporary architects whose buildings, in Caruso’s opinion, represent “a kind of abstraction that becomes more and more reduced of energy and any kind of relevance.” Caruso St John Architects’ Bremer Landesbank in Germany is one example of the architect’s approach. Placed in Bremen’s historic temple district, the building’s expressive brick facade refers to a northern European tradition and gothic character, “a tradition of brick architecture filtered through modern history,” says Caruso. The beauty of historic buildings is their flexibility, the way they can seamlessly change form warehouse to flats, from public schools to art galleries. “The physical thing, built with a particular intention, has all of this other potential in it. It’s like magic, like alchemy,” says Caruso. Today’s buildings are built as objects with only one purpose, to stand out, with none of the “open-endedness” of historic architecture. “Architecture becomes a commodity, a fantastic expression of late capitalism,” Caruso laments. “To me that’s the opposite of architecture.” Adam Caruso (b. 1962) is a London-based Canadian architect and founder of Caruso St John Architects, which he founded with Peter St John in 1990. He was Professor of Architecture at the University of Bath from 2002-2005 and has been Professor of Architecture and Construction at the ETH Zurich since 2011. Among many notable and award-winning projects Caruso St. John is behind the Bremer Landesbank, Bremen, Germany, the restructuring of the Victoria and Albert Museum of Childhood and the master plan for the Tate Britain, Millbank, both London, UK and several of the Gagosian Gallery sites. Adam Caruso was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at Bygningskulturens Hus in Copenhagen, Denmark in February 2017. Camera: Rasmus Quistgaard Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art 2017. Supported by Dreyers Fond FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel
Views: 14591 Louisiana Channel
Joan Jonas Interview: Advice to the Young
 
01:52
“Love what you do. Because it’s not easy. It’s not easy to make art.” Watch as the iconic video and performance artist Joan Jonas advises her younger colleagues to enjoy what they’re doing as you never know how people will respond to your work. Moreover, it’s important to have a circle of friends that you can spar with: “Art is about communication. Art is a dialogue with art, a dialogue with other artists, a dialogue with the past, with the future, and it’s an important dialogue to have.” Joan Jonas (b. 1936) is an American artist, who works with combinations of video, performance, installation, sculpture and drawing, often collaborating with musicians and dancers. Her cutting-edge ‘Mirror Pieces’ (late 1960’s) featured performers carrying mirrors on stage, slowly rotating them and thus transforming the audience into an image on glass. Jonas has had a number of solo exhibitions at prominent venues including Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, MoMA in New York, Tate Modern in London and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid. Moreover, she has been represented in dOCUMENTA in Kassel, Germany, six times since 1972. Among numerous honours and awards, Jonas is the recipient of a ‘Lifetime Achievement Award’ from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (2009). She lives and works in New York and Nova Scotia, Canada. For more about her see: http://joanjonasvenice2015.com Joan Jonas was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg at Malmö Konsthall in Sweden in November 2015 in connection to her exhibition ‘Light Time Tales’. Camera: Jakob Solbakken Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016 Supported by Nordea-fonden FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 4873 Louisiana Channel
Ian McKeever Interview: Mystery to the Viewer
 
14:46
“I am trying to take the sense of speed out of the visual world of looking.” Interview with renowned British artist, Ian McKeever. Slowing down in a world where “everything is changing all the time” is of the essence to McKeever, who never takes credit for finishing his paintings: “They finish themselves”, he says. A painting can easily sit for a couple of months to a year in the studio before it is once again taken out and recommenced. This sense of timeless flow, McKeever feels, seems to free the paintings from any specific moment or period in time. Leaving room for the mystery to grow on the viewer by drawing them in only to push them back out again is also at the core of McKeever’s beautiful and suggestive paintings. The sense of mystery is what forms the attraction, and the obvious is of little interest, as he says: “I think there are enough tables and chairs and people in the world already, I don’t see why we all have to paint them as well.” Ian McKeever (b.1946) is a British artist based in Dorset, England. He is a Visiting Professor in Painting at the Faculty of Art and Architecture at the University of Brighton. Between 2006-2011 he was Professor of Drawing at the Royal Academy School of Arts, London. Among his solo exhibitions are ‘Hours of Darkness and Hours of Light’ and ‘Twelve-Standing and Three’. Ian McKeever was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg at Horsens Art Museum, Denmark in 2014. Camera: Ole Udengaard Edited by Kasper Bech Dyg Produced by Kasper Bech Dyg, 2014 Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 46413 Louisiana Channel
Dan Graham: Advice to the Young
 
02:54
“Don’t make art as a career,” says award-winning American artist Dan Graham. “Because that means you’re just doing the same boring things that you reacted against in the beginning.” In this short interview Dan Graham offers advice to younger artists by tallying up the best and worst things about art schools: visiting many different artists, going on class excursions and having access to books are all important opportunities for the young artist. Also art schools might give access to technical schools so you can earn a living. The worst? “Trying to make art theoretical and misuse of the word ‘problematize’,” says Graham with a tongue-in-cheek poke at the contemporary art world. Furthermore Dan Graham advises young artists to go and experience great art in museums. Dan Graham (b. 1942) is an award-winning American conceptual artist whose work spans across curating, writing, performance, installation, video, photography and architecture. He is perhaps most known for his pavilions, which he has designed since the late 1970s and which have been realized across the world. His work has been shown at Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, USA, Musée d’art Moderne de la ville de Paris, Paris, France, Kiasma Museum, Helsinki, Finland and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark. Graham’s works are also shown numerous times at prestigious events such as dOCUMENTA in Kassel, Germany and at the Venice Biennale, in Italy. Dan Graham was interviewed by Christian Lund in his home in SoHo, New York, October 2015. Camera: Pierce Jackson Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016 Supported by Nordea-fonden FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 8412 Louisiana Channel
Glenn Branca Interview: Sounds From the Subconscious
 
05:39
"I had to squeeze the music out of that thing!" Feel the good vibes in this laid back interview with legendary American avant-garde composer and noise-guitarist Glenn Branca, who has influenced bands like Sonic Youth. "I want people to do what they want to do, not what culture wants them to do. " In this interview Glenn Branca talks about how he learned to play on a guitar which was really cheap and hard to play, and how he feels lucky to have been a young man in the '60s, when there was an explosion of good music and lots of amazing sounds to get into. Branca is always looking for new sounds and his primary interest is "opening music up to ambiguity," he says. We all see things in our own way Branca adds, "the subconscious is a very important part of my music." Branca's aim is to confuse the conscious mind, breaking it open, "allowing us to access the subconscious." Glenn Branca (b.1948) is known for his experimental use of volume, alternative guitar tunings, repetition, droning, and the harmonic series. In 2008 he was awarded an unrestricted grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. Glenn Branca was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg at Drop Inn & Huset-KBH with artFREQ, Radical High Culture, Copenhagen, Denmark, February 2014. Photography by Steen Møller Rasmussen Edited by Kasper Bech Dyg Produced by Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, produced by Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014. Supported by Nordea-fonden.
Views: 12378 Louisiana Channel
8 Artists on Painting
 
10:03
FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 83018 Louisiana Channel
Olafur Eliasson Interview: The Shape of an Idea
 
07:26
The space that ideas stem from is similar to a treasure room, according to artist Olafur Eliasson, who here discusses his remarkable art installation ‘Model Room’. A beginning has the shape of an idea, and before the idea is something one might call intuition or something that is ‘felt’: “It’s meaningful but it has no words,” Elisasson says. Adding words to an idea, therefore, can sometimes be counterproductive and makes the idea more pragmatic as it has to be explained: “Intuition is always a flow, it’s like a little poem of something which has not yet come to verbalization.” This is why Eliasson or people from his team, among these mathematician Einar Thorsteinn, make models, because these “small spatial experiments” help him realize whether the actual work of art is as good as the idea it is derived from. The extraordinary table, which is his art installation ‘Model Room’, is thus about the relationship between thinking and doing and about “celebrating the area around where things start - the ideas.” Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) works with sculpture, painting, photography, film and installations. He grew up in Iceland and Denmark and studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine arts from 1989-1995. In 1995 he moved to Berlin where he founded Studio Olafur Eliasson. Eliasson is behind many major exhibitions and projects around the world, such as ‘The Weather Project’ at Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2003, ‘Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson’ organized by SFMOMA in 2007, which travelled until 2010 to major venues such the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and ‘Riverbed’ at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Among Eliasson’s projects in public space are ‘Green River’, carried out in various cities from 1998-2001 and ‘The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion’ in 2007 in collaboration with Kjetil Thorsen of Snøhetta. He lives and works in Copenhagen and Berlin. Olafur Eliasson was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 44191 Louisiana Channel
8 Writers on Facing the Blank Page
 
05:05
“It’s like a slightly overweight, bald boss saying: ‘Oy, get to work! You’re supposed to be a writer, aren’t you? You can’t just sit around on your fat ass waiting to be inspired’.” Hear how David Mitchell and seven other critically acclaimed authors face the blank page. “The blank page of the mind has to be filled before you can face the actual blank page,” says American author novelist Jonathan Franzen (b. 1959) – a view mirrored by several of the writers featured in this anthology. Lydia Davis (b. 1947) never sits down in front of a blank page, but only confronts it when she has a note or a thought at hand, and Joyce Carol Oates (b. 1938) runs, meditates and thinks deeply before approaching the blank page: “I would never write first,” she says. “As soon as you write in language it becomes frozen (…) writing prematurely is a mistake.” A blank page can also be a door, a portal opening onto infinite possibilities. To David Mitchell (b. 1969) the blank page is like a fantastic night sky “with a super moon really close to the ground and all the stars and the galaxies. It makes your heart beat faster.” And the most important, explains award-winning author Margaret Atwood (b. 1939), is to be in the flow: “If you’re skiing downhill, and you stop in the middle of it to think ‘how am I doing this?’ you’ll fall over.” Also featured in this anthology is German novelist Daniel Kehlmann (b. 1975), American novelist Philipp Meyer (b. 1974) and Egyptian novelistAlaa Al-Aswany (b. 1957). Interviews by Christian Lund, Kasper Bech Dyg and Marc-Christoph Wagner. The interviews can be watched in full length at http://channel.louisiana.dk. Produced and edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016 Supported by Nordea-fonden FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 12015 Louisiana Channel
Yayoi Kusama Interview: Let's Fight Together
 
06:25
Welcome to the magical, polka-dotted, pumpkin-filled world of the legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, who uses her art to fight for love and peace. We had the pleasure of meeting the 86-year-old Kusama in her colourful Tokyo-studio. Kusama, who feels that we’re getting into the worst century, hopes that her artwork reflects her longing – and fight – for love and peace: “I have been expressing an infinite devotion to peace loving and the refusal of war and terrorism by infinite human love.” Infinity is key in this context, as all of her work – from fashion to literature and art – centres on the notion of infinity and “the marvellous mystery of the universe.” “I have the enthusiasm as if I was still a child.” Pumpkins have always played and continue to play an essential role in Kusama’s artwork. She depicts the impressive fruit through both drawings and sculptures of various sizes and material: “I love pumpkins because of their humorous form, warm feeling and a humanlike quality and shape.” Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929) is a Japanese artist and writer. She has worked in a wide variety of media, including paintings, collage, sculpture, performance art, fashion, and installations. Common for these different genres is the thematic interest in psychedelic colours, repetition and pattern (most famously dots). She moved to the United States in 1957 and soon became a fixture of the New York avant-garde scene, influencing contemporary artists such as Andy Warhol. It was also in New York, that she embraced the rise of the hippie counterculture of the late 1960s, organizing a series of happenings in which naked participants were painted with polka dots. In 1973 Kusama moved back to Japan, where she was suddenly perceived as a “Western” artist, and thus had to re-establish her network and position. Kusama’s work is in the collections of leading museums such as MoMA in New York, Tate Modern in London, Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Centre Pompidou in Paris and the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo. She has received numerous prestigious awards, including the Asahi Prize (2001), Order des Arts et des Lettres (2003), the Order of the Rising Sun (2006) and one of Japan’s most prestigious prizes, Praemium Imperiale (2006), which she was the first Japanese woman to receive. Kusama has also designed for the fashion-industry, collaborating with prominent designers such as Louis Vuitton. She lives and works in Tokyo, Japan. Yayoi Kusama was interviewed at her studio in Tokyo, Japan in June 2015. Camera: Yudai Maruyama Produced and edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 52557 Louisiana Channel
John Giorno Interview: Inside William S. Burroughs' Bunker
 
07:37
Step inside ‘The Bunker’ in New York, the windowless former apartment of the legendary writer William S. Burroughs, and let yourself be guided around – from Burroughs’ typewriter to his shooting target – by its current resident, the iconic poet John Giorno. William S. Burroughs lived several places throughout his life. Between 1975-82 the drug addict and writer –famous not least for his automatic writing in books like ‘Naked Lunch’– lived in 222 Bowery, one of New York’s first YMCAs in the 1880s. Performance poet John Giorno has lived at the address since the early 1960s and was delighted to host his friend and colleague, who lived in the basement for seven years and dubbed the windowless space ‘The Bunker’. “He was a brilliant transcendent writer, but he was more brilliant here,” Giorno recalls and explains how Burroughs was high from nine in the morning, and then would have vodkas and joints at five o’clock in the afternoon. Giorno himself would join him, albeit a bit later in the day: “Doing that for those endless years and years, that was a lesson – not sure what the lesson is though.” Having downed several more bottles of vodka and smoked more joints, Burroughs and his guests would shoot at the target poster, which still has its original bullet holes. John Giorno has been using ‘The Bunker’ as a guest room for visiting friends and today everything has been restored and kept like it was when Burroughs lived there: the target poster, the typewriter, the gun magazines and the desk all set for someone to sit down and write. We also get to see the ‘Orgone box’ – a box invented by psychoanalyst William Reich, who believed that orgones are vibratory atmospheric atoms of the life-principle, which can be concentrated as a creative substratum. “And if you sat in there you would collect orgone energy of the universal power,” Giorno adds. Burroughs “always believed there could be chaos and catastrophe, so every house should have a vessel to be able to save enough water to live for four days. So that’s why that was there,” says Giorno about the big water tank on the floor. Giorno also shows us Burroughs’ lamp, which is made from a – still functioning – rifle from the Civil War, as well as his BB gun: “It's a generational thing of his, coming of age as a young person in the 1920s and 30s, living in the country in St. Louis, and also outside, and being alone and being frail. I don't think his family were shooters, somehow it entered his life, all of those things.” John Giorno (b. 1936) is an American poet and one of the most influential figures in contemporary performance poetry with his intensely rhythmic and philosophical poetry. He has published a wide range of poetic works such as the collection ‘You Got to Burn to Shine’, spoken words with William S. Burroughs and Laurie Anderson. In 1962, Giorno was the subject of Andy Warhol’s 6-hour movie ‘Sleep’. Giorno has also created Giorno Poetry Systems, which has published more than 40 spoken LP’s with acclaimed artists such as Allen Ginsberg and Patti Smith. William S. Burroughs (b. William Seward Burroughs II in 1914 – d. 1997) was an American writer and artist. He was a primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major influence in popular culture and literature, he wrote eighteen novels and novellas, six collections of short stories and four collections of essays, found success with his confessional first novel ‘Junkie’ (1953) but is best known for his highly controversial third novel ‘Naked Lunch’ (1959). Along with artist, writer and poet Brion Gysin, Burroughs re-invented the literary cut-up technique in works such as ‘The Nova Trilogy’ (1961-1964). Much of Burroughs’ work is semi-autobiographical, primarily drawn from his experiences as a heroin addict. In 1951, he accidentally killed his wife Joan Vollmer with a pistol during a drunken ‘William Tell’ game and was consequently convicted of manslaughter. Through the years, Burroughs also created and exhibited thousands of paintings and other visual artworks, including his celebrated ‘Gunshot Paintings’. He did not, however, exhibit his artwork until 1987, and for last 10 years of his life, he presented his paintings and drawings at museums and galleries worldwide. He died at his home in Kansas after suffering a heart attack in 1997. John Giorno was interviewed by Christian Lund in New York City in October 2017. In the video, John Giorno reads from his poem ‘The Death of William Burroughs’ (1997). Photographs used in the video: Photo of William Burroughs (1989) - Courtesy of John Giorno Archives, Photo of William Burroughs with John Giorno and Keith Haring (1987) - Courtesy of Kate Simon, Photo of William Burroughs in the Bunker (1979) - Courtesy of Kate Simon Camera: Mathias Nyholm Edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2018 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 12724 Louisiana Channel
Karin Mamma Andersson Interview: Advice to the Young
 
02:50
“If you think Rubens is crap, then don’t bother with him.” Karin Mamma Andersson, one of Sweden’s most important contemporary painters, advises younger colleagues to learn your art history: “Focus on what you find interesting, but immerse yourself in it.” “There’s no reason to reinvent the wheel, art has always been like a game of Chinese whispers in which we give and take,” says the acclaimed artist, who also advises not to follow contemporary artistic trends. She underlines that the most important source of inspiration at art school does not come from the teachers, but from the other art students, your friends and peers. Karin Mamma Andersson (b. 1962) is one of Sweden’s most internationally acknowledged artists. She studied at the Royal University College of Fine Arts in Stockholm, at which time her nickname ‘Mamma’ was added to differentiate herself from another student with the same name. Her dreamlike, expressive compositions are often inspired by filmic imagery, theatre sets and private interiors. She is represented by Gallery Magnus Karlsson in Stockholm, http://www.gallerimagnuskarlsson.com/ and by David Zwirner Gallery in New York. Karin Mamma Andersson resides in Stockholm. Learn more at: http://www.davidzwirner.com/artists/mamma-andersson/biography/ Karin Mamma Andersson was interviewed by Christian Lund in her studio in Stockholm, Sweden, February 2015. Camera: Kasper Kiertzner Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produce by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016 Supported by Nordea-fonden FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 4477 Louisiana Channel
Gerhard Richter Interview: In Art We Find Beauty and Comfort
 
09:48
“I don’t really believe art has power. But it does have value. Those who take an interest in it find solace in art. It gives them huge comfort.” Gerhard Richter, one of the greatest painters of our time, discusses beauty in the era of the Internet in this rare interview. “These days, beauty is not in fashion,” says Richter, who has explored painting and its role in image culture for decades on his quest for a form of painting that corresponds to contemporary challenges. Quoting German author Thomas Mann, who predicted a change in art, Richter says: “Art will shed all of its gravity and transform into something merry and democratic.” But art has, in Richter’s view, surpassed even that. “It’s now more than merry. There has never been so much art … We don’t need it. We need entertainment. Sensations.” Beauty, however, is not lost for the artist: “Beauty is an ideal of mine as much as it ever was … But beauty is being discredited when fashion and models are called beautiful.” Boasting a diverse catalogue of paintings, Richter has always been suspicious of staying with the same motive and painterly strategy: “It’s more interesting to be insecure. You should have a measure of uncertainty and perplexity.” The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art recently acquired one of Richter’s 10 metre stripe-paintings, supplementing it’s collection of works by, and long standing relationship with, a painter who is considered the most important of the post-war era. As an incessant voice in contemporary German painting for more than half a century, he has witnessed the development of his country since World War II and in this light his resume of the state of affairs of his native country seems uplifting: “Actually we have the same or similar problems as all other countries nowadays… we’re looking ahead.” Gerhard Richter (b. 1932) was a professor at the Düsseldorf Art Academy from 1971-1994 and is the recipient of numerous prizes, among other the Golden Lion at the 47th Venice Biennale in 1997 and the 1998 Premium Imperial Prize. His paintings have been shown extensively, e.g. at the Tate Galleries, London, UK and at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, USA and his work is held in major collections around the world. Gerhardt Richter was interviewed by Anders Kold at his studio in Cologne, Germany, in September 2016. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 75025 Louisiana Channel
Bill Viola Interview: Cameras are Soul Keepers
 
28:10
When video artist Bill Viola was 6 years old he fell into a lake, all the way to the bottom, to a place which seemed like paradise. "There's more than just the surface of life." Viola explains. "The real things are under the surface". American Bill Viola (born 1951) is a pioneer in video art. In this interview, Viola talks about his development as an artist and his most important breakthroughs. As a child Bill Viola felt that the world inside his head was more real than the outside word. Viola discovered video in 1969. The blue light from the first camera he experienced reminded him of the water in that beautiful lake he almost died in when he was 6. The first video piece Viola did on his own was "Tape I" from 1972, when he was still at university. Viola replaced the university art theories with his own secret underground path, through Islamic mystics, to Buddhism, to Christianity and finally to St John of the Cross. It was a very liberating experience for him, when he first started calling his artworks what they actually were to him. Viola once felt that home videos should be kept separate to his artwork, but the sorrow of his mother's death, and the difficulty of understanding this transition from life to "disappearance", slowly changed his point of view. He realized that things could not be kept separate. Viola now sees the cameras as keepers of the soul, he explains. The medium holds onto life, a kind of understanding of feelings, keeping them alive. Bill Viola was interviewed by Christian Lund, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, in London, 2011. Camera: Marie Friis Grading: Honey Biba Beckerlee. Edited by Martin Kogi Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013 Supported by Nordea-fonden.
Views: 145920 Louisiana Channel
Wangechi Mutu: Cultural Cutouts
 
10:23
Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu uses her colourful artwork to confront the missing attention to black women within society: “It’s kind of an ironic thing that I’m producing that image out of the very lack of it.” Mutu creates impressive collages of magazine cutouts, which stir up the image of the black woman in our culture: ”For me, every little bit of culture can be used to investigate almost any other bit of culture.” The female body has been a central theme throughout Mutu’s practice, balancing the grotesque and beautiful with great precision and leaving the viewer in a constant limbo between the two. Another central point is the notion of action, letting the spectator sense that the work is part of something else, something bigger: “There is a dynamic quality to the work, even though they have been captured in one moment, there is movement.” Wangechi Mutu (b. 1972) is a Kenyan artist, who lives in New York. Mutu is considered one of the leading contemporary African artists and her work has been exhibited at various museums such as Tate Modern in London, Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and The New Museum and The Museum of Modern Art in New York. She holds a BFA from Cooper Union and a MFA from Yale University. Learn more about Wangechi Mutu at: www.wangechimutu.com Wangechi Mutu was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg in New York, 2014. Camera: Pierce Jackson Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 19325 Louisiana Channel
Wim Wenders: Advice to the Young
 
00:59
“Do what nobody else can do except for you.” Such is the unflagging advice from German filmmaker Wim Wenders, who in this video gives us his take on how to become a successful artist. According to Wenders, achieving success in your creative endeavors is quite simply a matter of “finding the thing that you can do better than anyone else.” The message is clear and delivered with great resolution by one of the most important German directors on the international scene. Wim Wenders (born Ernst Wilhelm Wenders in 1945) is the director behind movies such as ‘Paris, Texas’, ‘Wings of Desire’ (‘Der Himmel über Berlin’), ‘Faraway, So Close!’ (‘In weiter Ferne so nah’), ‘Buena Vista Social Club’ and ‘Pina’. He has received a multitude of international awards, including the Palme d’Or, the BAFTA and the Golden Lion. Since 1996 he has been the president of the European Film Academy in Berlin. Apart from being a highly praised filmmaker, Wenders is also an acclaimed playwright, photographer and author. Wim Wenders was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner. Camera: Simon Weyhe Edited: Kamilla Bruus Produced by Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2014. Copyright Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 25176 Louisiana Channel
William Kentridge Interview: How We Make Sense of the World
 
30:25
"There is a desperation in al certainty. The category of political uncertainty, philosophical uncertainty, uncertainty of images is much closer to how the world is", says South African artist William Kentridge in this video presenting his work. "The films come out of a need to make an image, an impulse to make a film, and the meaning emerges over the months of the making of the film. The only meaning they have in advance is the need for the film to exist". William Kentridge (b. 1955) is South Africa's most important contemporary artist, best known for his prints, drawings and animated films. In this video he presents his work, his way of working and his philosophy. He tells the story of how he failed to be an artist: "I failed at painting, I failed at acting, I failed at film making, so I discovered at the age of 30 I was back making drawings". It was not until he told himself he was an artist with all he wanted to included in the term - that he felt he was on the right track. "It took me a long time to unlearn the advice I had been giving. For for me the only hope was the cross fertilization between the different medias and genres." William Kentridge talks about the origin of his animated films with drawing in front of the camera. "I was interested in seeing how a drawing would come into being". "It was from the charcoal drawing that the process of animation expanded". With charcoal "you can change a drawing as quickly as you can think". "I am interested in showing the process of thinking. The way that one constructs a film out of these fragments that one reinterprets retrospectively - and changes the time of - is my sense of how we make sense of the world. And so the animated films can be a demonstration of how we make sense of the world rather than an instruction about what the world means." "Uncertainty is an essential category. As soon as one gets certain their voice gets louder, more authoritarian and authoritative and to defend themselves they will bring an army and guns to stand next to them to hold. There is a desperation in al certainty. The category of political uncertainty, philosophical uncertainty, uncertainty of images is much closer to how the world is. That is also related to provisionality, to the fact that you can see the world as a series of facts or photographs or you can see it as a process of unfolding. Where the same thing in a different context has a very different meaning or very different form." "I learned much more from the theatre school in Paris, Jacques Lecoq, a school of movement and mime, than I ever did from the art lessons. It is about understanding the way of thinking through the body. Making art is a practical activity. It is not sitting at a computer. It is embodying an idea in a physical material, paper, charcoal, steal, wood." William Kentridge will work on a piece not knowing if it will come out as a dead end or a pice of art, giving it the benefit of the doubt, not judging it in advance, he says. The artist has been compared to Buster Keaton and Gerorge Méliès. He mentions Hogarth, Francis Bacon, Manet, Philip Guston, Picasso, the Dadaists, Samuel Beckett and Mayakovski as inspirations. "I am considered a political artist by some people and as a non-political artist by other political artists. I am interested in the politics of certainty and the demagoguery of certainty and the fragility of making sense of the world", William Kentridge states. This video shows different excerpts from the work: 'The Journey to the Moon' (2003), 'The Refusal of Time' (2012) 'What Will Come (has already come)' (2007). William Kentridge was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Deutsche Staatstheater in Hamburg in January 2014 in connection with the performance of the stage version of 'The Refusal of Time', called 'Refuse The Hour'. Cameras: Nikolaj Jungersen Edit: Kamilla Bruus Produced by Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014.
Views: 119995 Louisiana Channel
Paul Auster Interview: The Meanness of New York
 
04:14
The iconic New York novelist, Paul Auster, comments on the much debated Eric Garner case, and why he doesn’t want to give his usual pep talk about his beloved New York. “The meanness of New York has come out again”, Auster states, referring to the tragic death of Eric Garner, who died on July 17, 2014 after being choked to death by a policeman in Staten Island, New York. Since then, protests and national discussions have broken out when the grand jury didn’t come forward with an indictment against the policeman even though the incident was caught on video. To have America live through the incident in Ferguson just recently, and now the case of Eric Garner in New York has led to the biggest racial discussion in America for a long time. Paul Auster (born 1947) is a highly acclaimed American novelist. He has published numerous novels such as the famous ‘The New York Trilogy’ (1987), ‘Moon Palace’ (1989), ‘Sunset Park’ (2010) and the autobiographical books ‘Winter Journal’ (2012) and ‘Report From the Interior’ (2013). He lives in Brooklyn, New York with his wife, novelist Siri Hustvedt. Paul Auster was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg in Brooklyn, New York, December 2014. Camera by: Anders Urmacher Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg Copyright: Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden
Views: 20995 Louisiana Channel

Rn cover letter tips that actually got
Free job cover letter
Uk passport cover letter
Article writing service
Pregnancy loss australia newsletter formats