Home
Search results “Financial regulation journal”
Financial Innovation and Innovative Financial Regulators [2018 JLEP Symposium]
 
01:39:47
14th Annual Symposium of the Journal of Law, Economics & Policy: Regulatory Reform, Transparency, and the American Economy This symposium was co-sponsored by the Regulatory Transparency Project and took place at the Antonin Scalia Law School on February 2, 2018. Further details can be found at http://masonlec.org/events/14th-annual-symposium-of-the-journal-of-law-economics-policy-regulatory-reform-transparency-and-the-economy/. Welcome & Introduction: --Bonnie Kelly, Editor in Chief, Journal of Law, Economics & Policy --Devon Westhill, Director, Regulatory Transparency Project, The Federalist Society Authors: Regulating in the Shadows: How Agencies Achieve Indirectly that Which they have No Authority to Achieve Directly (https://regproject.org/paper/regulating-in-the-shadows/) --Charles J. Cooper, Partner, Cooper & Kirk Consumer Protection at the FTC and the CFPB (https://regproject.org/paper/consumer-protection-ftc-cfpb/) --Todd Zywicki, George Mason University Foundation Professor of Law, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School Discussants: --Deepak Gupta, Founding Principal, Gupta Wessler PLLC --David C. Vladeck, A.B. Chettle Chair, Georgetown University Law Center Moderator: --Paolo Saguato, Assistant Professor of Law, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School * * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.
Views: 12802 The Federalist Society
Biden Defends Obama Financial-Regulation Policies
 
00:53
Speaking at Georgetown University Monday, Vice President Joe Biden defended the Obama administration's financial regulatory policies. Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 274 Wall Street Journal
Gearty Grilling: Jon Danielsson on Financial Regulation
 
05:07
Dr Jon Danielsson, Reader in Finance and Director of the Systemic Risk Centre, discusses financial risk and regulation.
JLB Symposium: Impact of Domestic and International Financial Regulation on Financial Services
 
01:33:45
The NYU Journal of Law & Business presents the spring symposium, "Developments in Domestic & International Financial Regulation." Panel 3: Impact of Domestic and International Financial Regulation on the Financial Services Industry Moderator: Laurie Ferber '80 Executive Vice President and General Counsel, MF Global Holdings, New York, NY and Life Trustee, NYU School of Law Panelists: - Roy C. Smith, Kenneth G. Langone Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance and Professor of Management Practice, NYU Stern School of Business, New York, NY - Supurna VedBrat, Managing Director, Co-head Electronic Trading & Market Structure, Investment Management, BlackRock, New York, NY - Richard Herring, Jacob Safra Professor of International Banking, Professor of Finance, Wharton, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA - Bonnie Litt, Managing Director, Associate General Counsel and Legal Director, Commodity and Financial Futures and Derivatives, Goldman Sachs, New York, NY - Will Rhode, Principal, Director of Fixed Income, TABB Group, New York, NY This event took place on January 31, 2014.
Views: 668 NYU School of Law
DT2014 - Financial Regulation: Legislative Perspective
 
30:11
Legislative Perspective Open Data in Financial Regulation Sponsored by RDG Filings Hon. Patrick McHenry U.S. House of Representatives Host—Jonathan Elliott RDG Filings Moderator—Theo Francis The Wall Street Journal
Views: 65 DataCoalition
Where We Are Now: Financial Inclusion
 
01:34
Recent years have seen a boom in people getting bank accounts in the Asia-Pacific region. But statistics show that there is still a way to go in reaching the neediest. Image: Nick Shearman Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 2580 Wall Street Journal
Debating Financial Regulation (Part 1)
 
11:12
White House Economic Adviser Austan Goolsbee, Sens. Bob Corker, Sherrod Brown.
Views: 895 ABC News
Going After Individuals for Financial Misconduct
 
04:54
Panel discussion on enforcement at a Pro Financial Regulation Event delves into how to conduct cases against individuals versus institutions and why there is so much fear among compliance officers. Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 234 Wall Street Journal
The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad
 
19:26
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The Great Economic Myth of 2008, challenging the accounting to accounting principal. Brian Wesbury is Chief Economist at First Trust Advisors L.P., a financial services firm based in Wheaton, Illinois. Mr. Wesbury has been a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 1999. In 2012, he was named a Fellow of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, TX where he works closely with its 4%-Growth Project. His writing appears in various magazines, newspapers and blogs, and he appears regularly on Fox, Bloomberg, CNBCand BNN Canada TV. In 1995 and 1996, he served as Chief Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. The Wall Street Journal ranked Mr. Wesbury the nation’s #1 U.S. economic forecaster in 2001, and USA Today ranked him as one of the nation’s top 10 forecasters in 2004. Mr. Wesbury began his career in 1982 at the Harris Bank in Chicago. Former positions include Vice President and Economist for the Chicago Corporation and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for Griffin, Kubik, Stephens, & Thompson. Mr. Wesbury received an M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Montana. McGraw-Hill published his first book, The New Era of Wealth, in October 1999. His most recent book, It’s Not As Bad As You Think, was published in November 2009 by John Wiley & Sons. In 2011, Mr. Wesbury received the University of Montana’s Distinguished Alumni Award. This award honors outstanding alumni who have “brought honor to the University, the state or the nation.” There have been 267 recipients of this award out of a potential pool of 91,000 graduates. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 1840741 TEDx Talks
Greece's finance minister in Germany | Journal
 
01:27
Greece's finance minister has delivered a clear meassage to the European Central Bank ahead of a meeting in Berlin on Thursday. Read more: www.dw.de/english
Views: 405 DW English
DT2014 - Financial Regulation: Executive Perspective
 
32:32
Executive Perspective Open Data in Financial Regulation Sponsored by DataTracks Mark Flannery Chief Economist and Director, Division of Economic and Risk Analysis, Securities and Exchange Commission Moderator—Theo Francis The Wall Street Journal
Views: 64 DataCoalition
Leases | Financial Accounting & Reporting | Miles CPA Review
 
01:56:05
http://www.milescpareview.com/ Accounting for Leases in the United States regulated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) by the Financial Accounting Standards Number 13.The accounting profession recognizes leases as either an operating lease or a capital lease (finance lease). A simple yet conceptual topic dealt perfectly! Watch this exclusive video from FAR section of CPA course and master the topic using this dynamic and interactive lecture. http://www.milescpareview.com/
Views: 87695 Miles CPAReview
Members' Briefing: Simple, Transparent and Standardised securitisation – full steam ahead?
 
49:08
Following the publication of the new securitisation regulation in the EU Official Journal, at the end 2017, we examined the key components of the new STS regime and looked at the work ahead to develop an effective and sustainable market in Europe. AFME securitisation experts led the call and were joined by a panel of investors - Harry Noutsos, ING, Janet Oram, Blackrock and Rob Ford, 24 Asset Management - who offered their perspective on implementation challenges.
"The irrelevance of Brexit for the European Financial Market“ by Prof. Dr. Wolf-Georg Ringe
 
01:03:39
Wolf-Georg Ringe is Professor of Law at the University of Hamburg and Director of the Institute of Law & Economics. He also teaches at the University of Oxford. Professor Ringe’s work relates to European and global issues of corporate and financial law, as well as capital markets. He has been advising both the European Commission and the European Parliament on issues of European Corporate Law. He is the general editor of the Journal of Financial Regulation.
JLB Symposium: Updates on Dodd-Frank Derivatives Regulation
 
01:54:07
The NYU Journal of Law & Business presents the spring symposium, "Developments in Domestic & International Financial Regulation." Introductory Remarks: Peter Horn, Editor-in-Chief, NYU Journal of Law & Business Leslie C. Krusen IV, Managing Editor: Academic Events, NYU Journal of Law & Business Welcome Remarks: Trevor W. Morrison, Dean and Clarence D. Ashley Professor of Law, NYU School of Law Panel 1: Updates on Dodd-Frank Derivatives Regulation Moderator: James B. Carlson, Partner, Mayer Brown, New York, NY and Adjunct Professor of Law, NYU School of Law Panelists: - Ken M. Raisler '76, Partner, Sullivan & Cromwell, New York, NY USA and Board of Trustees, NYU School of Law - Ryne Miller LLM '09, Associate, Sullivan & Cromwell, New York, NY and Former Legal Counsel to CFTC Chairmen Gary Gensler - Gordon Kiesling, Head of Equity Derivatives Legal, Executive Director and Counsel, UBS Securities, UBS Investment Bank, Stamford, CT This event took place on January 31, 2014.
Views: 340 NYU School of Law
Regulatory Responsibility: The Way Forward for Fintech Compliance
 
29:29
Speakers: Hans Morris, Nyca Partners Jeffrey Bandman, CFTC Peter Rudegeair, The Wall Street Journal
Views: 231 CB Insights
Andrew W. Lo on "Adaptive Markets: Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought"
 
01:24:23
Evening Lecture/Symposia Series Andrew W. Lo on "Adaptive Markets: Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought" Wednesday, January 24, 2018 | 05:30 PM to 07:00 PM Event presented by the Museum of American Finance, the Fordham University Gabelli Center for Global Security Analysis and Bloomberg for Education Half of all Americans have money in the stock market, yet economists can't agree on whether investors and markets are rational and efficient, as modern financial theory assumes, or irrational and inefficient, as behavioral economists believe―and as financial bubbles, crashes and crises suggest. This is one of the biggest debates in economics and the value or futility of investment management and financial regulation hang on the outcome. Andrew Lo cuts through this debate with a new framework, the Adaptive Markets Hypothesis, in which rationality and irrationality coexist. Drawing on psychology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, artificial intelligence and other fields, Professor Lo shows that the theory of market efficiency isn't wrong but merely incomplete. When markets are unstable, investors react instinctively, creating inefficiencies for others to exploit. His new paradigm explains how financial evolution shapes behavior and markets at the speed of thought―a fact revealed by swings between stability and crisis, profit and loss, and innovation and regulation. About the Speaker Andrew W. Lo is the Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management and director of the MIT Laboratory for Financial Engineering. He has published numerous articles in finance and economics journals, and has authored several books including Adaptive Markets: Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought, The Econometrics of Financial Markets, A Non-Random Walk Down Wall Street, Hedge Funds: An Analytic Perspective and The Evolution of Technical Analysis. His awards include the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship, the Paul A. Samuelson Award, the American Association for Individual Investors Award, the Graham and Dodd Award and numerous other awards and honors. MUSEUM OF AMERICAN FINANCE 48 Wall Street | New York, NY 10005 Tel: 212.908.4110 | Fax: 212.742.0573 To share or join this event simply go to: http://www.youtube.com/user/FinanceMuseum/live
JLB Symposium: Harmony and Conflict in International Financial Regulation
 
01:26:24
The NYU Journal of Law & Business presents the spring symposium, "Developments in Domestic & International Financial Regulation." Panel 2: Harmony and Conflict in International Financial Regulation Moderator: Gary DeWaal, President, Gary DeWaal and Associates, New York, NY Panelists: - Hélène Vletter-Van Dort, Senior Visiting Fellow, Pollack Center NYU and Professor, Erasmus School of Law of the University of Rotterdam and University of Groningen, Member of the Board Dutch Central Bank - Dietmar Rieg, President & CEO of the German American Chamber of Commerce, New York, NY - Georges Pineau, Permanent Representative in Washington, D.C., European Central Bank, Washington, D.C. - Eric Pan, Associate Director, SEC Office of International Affairs, Washington, D.C. - Dan Berkovitz, Partner, WilmerHale, Washington, D.C. This event took place on January 31, 2014.
Views: 173 NYU School of Law
Paul Tucker Writes on Financial Regulation
 
01:52
http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2014/01/16-regulatory-reform-stability-central-banking-tucker Brookings Senior Fellows David Wessel and Ted Gayer discuss the paper by the former Deputy Governor of Bank of England, Paul Tucker, who writes about financial regulation and ways to prevent the next financial crisis.
Capital Markets Law Journal: The Eurozone
 
09:36
Jeffrey Golden, Lachlan Burn, and Mitu Gulati discuss the recent financial problems in the Eurozone. http://cmlj.oxfordjournals.org/
How are banks coping with the crisis? | Journal Interview
 
12:07
The head of Germany's banking association, Andreas Schmitz, tells DW that banking reforms are slowly taking hold in Germany, but that the sector has a long way to go to really change. He also gives us his views on the eurozone debt crisis and Europe-wide financial regulation, while expressing confidence in the euro currency. Read more: www.dw.de/journal-interview-with-andreas-schmitz-president-of-the-bankers-association/a-16423360
Views: 125 DW English
Unintended Consequences of the New Financial Regulations
 
01:30:26
Speaker(s): Dr Jon Danielsson, Professor Charles Goodhart, Matt King Chair: Professor Christopher Polk Recorded on 11 March 2013 in Old Theatre, Old Building. The first public event of the ESRC Systemic Risk Centre at LSE will debate whether the post crisis reforms of financial regulations will be effective in protecting us from financial excesses, or may perversely destabilise the financial system. The panel of experts will debate the topic and take questions from the audience. Jon Danielsson is the director of the Systemic Risk Centre at LSE. His research interests include financial stability, systemic risk, extreme market movements, market liquidity and financial crisis. He has published his research extensively in both academic journals and the mainstream media, and has presented his work at a number of universities and institutions. Charles Goodhart is emeritus professor of Banking and Finance with the Financial Markets Group at LSE, having previously, 1987-2005, been its deputy director. Until his retirement in 2002, he had been the Norman Sosnow Professor of Banking and Finance at LSE since 1985. Before then, he had worked at the Bank of England for seventeen years as a monetary adviser, becoming a chief adviser in 1980. In 1997 he was appointed one of the outside independent members of the Bank of England's new Monetary Policy Committee until May 2000. Earlier he had taught at Cambridge and LSE. Besides numerous articles, he has written a couple of books on monetary history; a graduate monetary textbook, Money, Information and Uncertainty (2nd Ed. 1989); two collections of papers on monetary policy, Monetary Theory and Practice (1984) and The Central Bank and The Financial System (1995); and a number of books and articles on Financial Stability, on which subject he was adviser to the Governor of the Bank of England, 2002-2004, and numerous other studies relating to financial markets and to monetary policy and history. His latest books include The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision: A History of the Early Years, 1974-1997, (2011), and The Regulatory Response to the Financial Crisis, (2009). Matt King is managing director and global head of Credit Products Strategy at Citi. His team is responsible for forming views and advising clients on the full spectrum of credit, across high grade, high yield, leveraged loan, structured, emerging and municipal bond markets. While the majority of clients are investors, he also deals frequently with issuers and regulators on everything from market direction to valuation to risk management. Matt King is a frequent speaker at industry conferences and has published extensively on credit markets over the past two decades. Some of his most widely referenced pieces include Are the brokers broken? (published two weeks before Lehman's bankruptcy), Buy the bubbles, sell the bath, and How much debt is too much debt? Prior to joining Citi in 2003, Mr King was head of European Credit Strategy at JPMorgan. He is British, and a graduate of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he read Social & Political Sciences.
21st Century Business Models Meet 20th Century Regulation [2018 JLEP Symposium]
 
01:35:45
14th Annual Symposium of the Journal of Law, Economics & Policy: Regulatory Reform, Transparency, and the American Economy This symposium was co-sponsored by the Regulatory Transparency Project and took place at the Antonin Scalia Law School on February 2, 2018. Further details can be found at http://masonlec.org/events/14th-annual-symposium-of-the-journal-of-law-economics-policy-regulatory-reform-transparency-and-the-economy/. Authors: Regulators in Cyberia (https://regproject.org/paper/regulators-in-cyberia/) --Stewart A. Baker, Partner, Steptoe & Johnson --Justin ‘Gus’ Hurwitz, Assistant Professor of Law and Co-Director of Space, Cyber, and Telecom Law Program, University of Nebraska College of Law Discussants: --Alan Butler, Senior Privacy Counsel, Electronic Privacy Information Center --Brenda Leong, Senior Counsel and Director of Strategy, Future of Privacy Forum Moderator: --Sandra Aistars, Senior Scholar and Director Copyright Research & Policy, Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property; Clinical Professor, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School * * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.
Views: 11617 The Federalist Society
Opinion | It’s time to plan for the next financial crisis
 
08:26
Opinion | It’s time to plan for the next financial crisis WorldPost, The WorldPost, housing crisis, financial crisis, 2008, 2008 crash, global financial crisis, GFC, deregulation, cyber attack, Congress, treasury secretary, financial markets, FDIC insurance, Lehman Brothers, market discipline, Federal Reserve, recession, global recession, economic crisis, economic collapse, economic crash, financial crash https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd4_4MPV20qVj80Rm_cQHOw?sub_confirmation=1 A man walks toward the New York Stock Exchange. Mar. 1, 2018. (Seth Wenig/Associated Press) By Kathryn Judge October 9 Kathryn Judge is a professor of law at Columbia Law School and an editor of the Journal of Financial Regulation. Ten years ago, the United States was mired in a financial crisis that caused housing prices to plummet by almost a third, major stock indices to fall by half, unemployment to spike to 10 percent and 9 million Americans to lose their homes. While banks are safer today than they were in 2007, the financial system remains vulnerable. The challenge is that we can never know what exactly will trigger the next global recession. For example, while Congress and regulators have addressed many of the causes of the last crisis, those reforms are already being watered down. If deregulation continues, risk-taking could escalate. Another challenge is that the financial system is constantly changing, making it impossible to panic-proof. The last crisis erupted not in banks but in the “shadow-banking system,” which serves bank-like functions and is exposed to bank-like risks while operating largely outside the direct purview of bank regulators. There are also new risks in modern finance, such as the possibility of large-scale cyber attacks against numerous financial institutions or critical infrastructure. How, then, can governments set up a crisis-management system when they don’t know when or where the next crisis will strike or what the underlying cause will be? One way is to give the Treasury secretary an emergency guarantee authority. When the government provides a guarantee, it promises to protect an investor from losing money on a particular investment. Guarantees have a long history of being used to prevent individuals and other investors from withdrawing funds en masse and damaging the financial system in the process. The emergency guarantee authority would allow the Treasury secretary to guarantee virtually any financial claim, giving him the flexibility needed to contain a panic wherever it erupts. The aim is to stabilize financial markets during a crisis while giving regulators the time to figure out root causes. The incredible breadth of the proposed emergency guarantee authority would need two counterbalances. The first is a strict time limit. Knowing that the mechanisms used to stabilize the system are finite would keep policymakers and bankers focused on identifying underlying causes and developing a plan to address them. A time limit of no more than two years would separate short-term crisis management from the process of resolving deeper problems. The second needed counterbalance is meaningful procedural checks to limit the use of temporary guarantees to times when the Treasury secretary, in consultation with the president, believes there is a grave and imminent threat to the system and there is no other way to contain the looming panic. There should also be robust reporting requirements, providing the public a
Views: 64 Dongo NEWS
Pro Forma Financial Information: Regulation S-X Article 11
 
05:28
Learn more at PwC.com - http://pwc.to/2kR6G3K Pro forma financial information is required in certain circumstances, such as significant business combinations or dispositions. In this video, PwC’s Rick Ruiz highlights the pro forma financial information requirements, as governed by Article 11 of Regulation S-X, including common pro forma adjustments, and shares common pitfalls for preparers.
Views: 516 PwC US
Bill Black: Financial Regulations In Paralysis
 
20:32
Bill Black knows banks. As a federal litigator in the late 1980s, Black played a central role in prosecuting the corruption responsible for the savings and loan crisis of the late 1980s. Since then he’s become one of America's top experts on financial fraud, which he see as endemic to the modern financial system. In this interview, Black expresses his lament that the U.S. has descended into a type of crony capitalism that makes continued fraud a virtual certainty while increasingly neutering the safeguards intended to prevent and punish such abuse. This was not the case when Black was a regulator. In the aftermath of the S&L crisis, the U.S. Office of Thrift Supervision brought 3,000 lawsuits against identified perpetrators. In a number of cases, the OTS was able to claw back the funds and profits that the convicted parties had fraudulently obtained. Fast forward to the 2008 financial collapse, in which the losses related to the household sector alone were over 70 times greater than they were during heart of the S&L crisis. The fraud was rampant and fairly obvious. Yet how many criminal referrals did the OTS make? Zero. What happened? Why has the OTS and other regulators allowed the same managements that crashed the mortgage market and dragged down the global financial markets with them to remain unprosecuted and free to continue looting the system? To be sure, some of the fraudulent activity has been exposed, and the top banks have paid numerous fines for bad behavior. There have been a lot of settlements and civil cases, indicating that fraud was rampant. But in finance, you can always make more money. Prosecutions, on the other hand, get everyone’s attention. Yet, Washington has been paralyzed. The U.S. attorney general has not begun a single investigation of criminal behavior by top management at major multinational banks. Seemingly there’s no real punishment for major misbehavior in the financial markets anymore. In this interview, Black names names and highlights the extent of the government's complicity in extending this disgraceful state of affairs.
Views: 11497 New Economic Thinking
Fraud and Financial Regulation: Bill Black at Harvard Law
 
01:07:34
31 years ago, Charles Keating asked five U.S. Senators—the Keating Five—to meet with regulators in an effort to convince them to back off Lincoln Savings and Loan Association. One of the regulators present was William K. Black, of whom Keating would later write “get Black—kill him dead.” Lincoln ultimately failed and Keating went to prison for fraud. In the decades since Lincoln’s failure and the savings and loan crisis, frauds continued to plague the financial industry, culminating in the crisis of 2007-08. The government's response failed to seriously address the problem of financial frauds, and they continue to occur. Currently a professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the University of Minnesota, Black is the author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank Is to Own One and developed the concept of “control fraud” to describe the use of a seemingly legitimate entity by its executives as a weapon to commit fraud—something that occurs with alarming frequency, particularly in the financial industry. Previously, he was the Executive Director of the Institute for Fraud Prevention, the litigation director of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, deputy director of the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, senior vice president and general counsel of the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco, and Senior Deputy Chief Counsel at the Office of Thrift Supervision. He has advised leaders from the World Bank, Iceland, and France on combating fraud and financial crises. On April 6, 2018, he came to Harvard Law to speak about his experiences as a regulator and the current state of financial regulation.
How Republicans Could Dismantle Dodd-Frank
 
02:09
President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to dismantle Dodd-Frank, but a full repeal of the financial regulation law is unlikely without 60 votes in the Senate. Instead, the GOP might weaken the law without tearing it up. WSJ's Shelby Holliday reports. Photo: Getty. Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 1390 Wall Street Journal
Bitcoin Expert James Altucher: More Regulations Will Help Legitimize Digital Currencies | CNBC
 
05:51
James Altucher, Formula Capital and Stockpicker.com managing director, and Dennis Berman, Wall Street Journal financial editor, discuss the big cryptocurrency sell-off. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Find CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC Bitcoin Expert James Altucher: More Regulations Will Help Legitimize Digital Currencies | CNBC
Views: 43056 CNBC
Justin OBrien: Future of Financial Regulation
 
47:34
About this Event 05 Nov 2009 @ 12:45 The Future of Financial Regulation: Retrieving the Meaning of Accountability in Capital Markets About the Speech: As the fallout of the financial crisis continues to devastate the real economy, the design of effective and flexible regulatory and corporate governance rules, principles and norms has become a global policy imperative. In this context, Prof. OBrien spoke of the need to shift from government to governance, to accountability, to responsibility, and finally to integrity, a process which requires inter-disciplinary collaboration and an application of behavioural economics. He argued that only by embedding integrity through design can the inevitable gaps in any new regulatory framework be adequately resolved. About the Speaker: Professor Justin OBrien has worked as a news journalist with the BBC and editor of television current affairs at UTV. He was appointed a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Governance, Queens University, Belfast in 2002 and subsequently moved to the Law School where he developed and ran the LLM in Corporate Governance and Public Policy. In August 2006, he was appointed Professor of Corporate Governance in the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the Australian National University. Professor O'Brien has published many books, journals and newspaper articles (including for the Irish Times, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. His most recent monograph, Engineering a Financial Bloodbath: How Sub-prime Securitization Destroyed the Legitimacy of Financial Capitalism, has just been published by Imperial College Press. His other books include Redesigning Financial Regulation: The Politics of Enforcement (2007); Private Equity, Corporate Governance and the Dynamics of Capital Market Regulation (ed.) (2007); and Governing The Corporation (ed.) (2005).
Views: 3644 IIEA1
2011 Journal of Law & Business Symposium: Panel 2
 
01:39:06
2011 Journal of Law & Business Symposium: Regulatory Reform and the Future of the U.S. Financial System: An examination of the Dodd-Frank Regulation Panel 2: Banking Reform Moderated by Ryan Bubb, Assistant Professor of Law, NYU School of Law H. Rodgin Cohen - Partner and Senior Chairman, Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Richard K. Kim - Partner, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Annette L. Nazareth - Partner, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Lawrence J. White - Arthur E. Imperatore Professor of Economics, Leonard N. Stern School of Business
Views: 1602 NYU School of Law
Stress Test: What Is Bank Capital?
 
03:23
Banks are required to meet capital requirements in order to pass government stress tests. So what is capital, and how much is needed? WSJ's Liz Hoffman reports. Illustration: Heather Seidel/The Wall Street Journal Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 8708 Wall Street Journal
The Future of Fractional Reserve Banking in Light of Recent Reforms: Is Jimmy Stewart Dead?
 
01:19:23
Professor Emilios Avgouleas, University of Edinburgh, gave a lecture entitled "The Future of Fractional Reserve Banking in Light of Recent Reforms: Is Jimmy Stewart Dead?" in discussion with Professor Eilis Ferran on Tuesday, 28 April 2015 at the Faculty of Law as a guest of 3CL. Professor Emilios Avgouleas is the inaugural holder of the International Banking Law and Finance Chair at the University of Edinburgh, the Head of the Commercial Law Subject Area, and the director of the Edinburgh LLM in International Banking Law and Finance. Reading: - Emilios Avgouleas, 'Large Systemic Banks and Fractional Reserve Banking, Intractable Dilemmas in Search of Effective Solutions' Chapter in Arner, Avgouleas, Buckley (eds), Reconceptualizing Global Finance and its Regulation (Cambridge University Press, 2015) forthcoming; - 'Critical Reflections on Bank Bail-ins', Emilios Avgouleas; Charles Goodhart (2015) 1 Journal of Financial Regulation 1; - 'Excessive Leverage and Bankers' Pay: Governance and Financial Stability Costs of a Symbiotic Relationship', (2015) 21 Columbia Journal of European Law. For the slides from this lecture, please see: http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/repo-documents/pdf/events/avgouleas_3CL_slides.pdf For more information see the Centre for Corporate and Commercial Law website at http://www.3cl.law.cam.ac.uk/
Geithner outlines plan for finance reform-1/2
 
10:50
Geithner Outlines Plan to Overhaul Nation's Financial Regulatory System Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner outlined plans Thursday to rewrite the nations financial rules as part of what the Wall Street Journal described as the most comprehensive changes to financial market regulation since the New Deal. Geithners plan includes the creation of a single regulator to monitor any firm whose failure could threaten the financial system. We speak with economist James Galbraith. [includes rush transcript]
Views: 149 Donovon Ceaser
Financial Regulator - Money isn't scary anymore!
 
00:22
Financial Regulator - Money isn't scary anymore! Visit www.itsyourmoney.ie
Views: 954 chetherington
Accounts : Financial Statement of Insurance Company : Lecture 1
 
01:05:22
To Buy DVDs of CA / CMA / CS call us at 0551-6050551 / 9889004575 / 011-45695551 www.badlaniclasses.online [email protected]
Views: 73940 CA dilip badlani
Understand Golden Rules of Accounting by a 17 year old Commerce Student
 
10:59
Follow me on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Studywithlavish Golden rules of Accounting, personal Account, Real account, Journal entries, Nominal account, commerce, accounts, accounting, B.com, BBA, how to record journal entries, Golden rules of accounting in english, golden rules of accounting with examples, Golden rules of accounting in hindi
Views: 236683 Lavish Gupta
President Obama Announces Financial Regulation Reform
 
19:39
June 18, 2009 | 19:39 As the culmination of a months-long process in which the President consulted with the most expert and experienced regulators, leaders in Congress, and his entire economic team, he announces his vision for desperately needed financial regulatory reform. A major brick in the new foundation for Americas economy. June 17, 2009. (Public Domain)
Views: 70 infomisa
The New Financial Regulatory Environment and its Implications for Financial Markets
 
01:46:10
Session: AFA Panel: The New Financial Regulatory Environment and its Implications for Financial Markets January 6, 2017 14:30 to 16:30 Sheraton Grand Chicago, Sheraton Ballroom V Session Chair: Deborah Lucas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Presented by: Tobias Adrian, International Monetary Fund Presented by: Stephen Berger, Citadel Presented by: Darrell Duffie, Stanford University Presented by: Deborah Lucas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Views: 419 afajof
Bill Black At Harvard Law, April 6, 2018
 
01:09:18
31 years ago, Charles Keating asked five U.S. Senators—the Keating Five—to meet with regulators in an effort to convince them to back off Lincoln Savings and Loan Association. One of the regulators present was William K. Black, of whom Keating would later write “get Black—kill him dead.” Lincoln ultimately failed and Keating went to prison for fraud. In the decades since Lincoln’s failure and the savings and loan crisis, frauds continued to plague the financial industry, culminating in the crisis of 2007-08. The government's response failed to seriously address the problem of financial frauds, and they continue to occur. Currently a professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the University of Minnesota, Black is the author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank Is to Own One and developed the concept of “control fraud” to describe the use of a seemingly legitimate entity by its executives as a weapon to commit fraud—something that occurs with alarming frequency, particularly in the financial industry. Previously, he was the Executive Director of the Institute for Fraud Prevention, the litigation director of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, deputy director of the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, senior vice president and general counsel of the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco, and Senior Deputy Chief Counsel at the Office of Thrift Supervision. He has advised leaders from the World Bank, Iceland, and France on combating fraud and financial crises. He will speak about his experiences as a regulator and the current state of financial regulation. Sponsored by the Harvard Law Forum, the Tax Law and Financial Regulation Students Association, the Modern Money Network, and the DOS Grant Fund.
Views: 921 Real Progressives
The 2008 banking crisis: Are we due another?
 
07:52
In 2008, the banking system was near total collapse, the stock market was in free fall, and government officials (it seemed to many) were as clueless as the rest of us. CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger looks back at the housing and banking crisis that almost dragged the world down into another Great Depression, and talks with historian Adam Tooze and Wall Street Journal reporter Gretchen Morgenson about how many of the new rules put into place to protect the system from suffering another meltdown are being diluted. Subscribe to the "CBS Sunday Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20gXwJT Get more of "CBS Sunday Morning" HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlMmAz Follow "CBS Sunday Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/23XunIh Like "CBS Sunday Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1UUe0pY Follow "CBS Sunday Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1RquoQb Follow "CBS Sunday Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1O3jk4x Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B --- "CBS Sunday Morning" features stories on the arts, music, nature, entertainment, sports, history, science, Americana and highlights unique human accomplishments and achievements. Check local listings for CBS Sunday Morning broadcast times.
Views: 24363 CBS Sunday Morning
Financial Regulations for Improving Financial Inclusion | UN Conference on Trade and Development
 
01:15:27
Poor regulation is one of the major obstacles to financial inclusion. What can policymakers do? CGD senior fellow Liliana Rojas-Suarez presents at the 2016 UN Conference on Trade and Development. Learn more at http://www.cgdev.org/publication/ft/financial-regulations-improving-financial-inclusion-brief
Financial System Reforms and Executive Pay
 
05:33
In the wake of the financial crisis of last fall, the Obama Administration appointed pay czar Kenneth Feinberg to work with the Department of the Treasury to sort out the way top executives at firms are compensated and what reforms should be made. Just last week, Feinberg came out with a plan to drastically slash compensation at seven companies bailed out by the federal government. But is focusing on reforming executive compensation barking up the wrong tree? In this edition of Smith Business Close-Up with the University of Marylands Robert H. Smith School of Business, Haluk Ünal talks about his new research that finds executive compensation may not be the negative force its made out to be. Ünal is a professor of finance, a research advisor at the Center for Financial Research at the FDIC, and a fellow of the Wharton Financial Institutions Center. His current research focuses on supply, demand and regulation of financial services. Specifically, he has conducted research to answer questions in risk management, credit-risk pricing, and the analysis of incentives and conflicts in bank ownership changes. His work has been published in the Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Money Credit and Banking, Review of Derivatives Research, and other leading journals.
Views: 378 SmithBusinessSchool
Plenary 4 - Global Finance - made in law
 
01:08:55
Presenter - Katharina Pistor Katharina Pistor is Michael I. Sovern Professor of Law at Columbia Law School and director of its Center on Global Legal Transformation, which is conducting research projects on law and finance, the distributional effects of transnational private regulation, the tragedy of exclusion, and rescaling the state in the context of globalisation. Her research focuses on comparative law and institutions with emphasis on emerging markets, the legal construction of financial markets, governing essential resources, and law and development. She has published widely in leading law and social science journals and has co-authored and edited several books. In 2012 she was co-recipient (with Martin Hellwig) of the Max Planck Research Award on International Financial Regulation. She is also the recipient of research grants by the Institute for New Economic Thinking and the National Science Foundation.
Views: 431 TheSmithSchool
Lease Accounting Overview (the new lease rule)
 
07:16
This video provides an overview of lease accounting based on the new accounting rule per U.S. GAAP (ASU 2016-02). Under the new rule, all leases longer than one year must be capitalized. This means the lessee recognizes the property being leased as an asset, along with a corresponding liability for the lease payments. This is important, as many firms avoided recognizing billions of dollars in liabilities under the old lease accounting rules by structuring their leases to avoid capitalization. Even though all leases longer than one year must now be capitalized, both lessors and lessees must perform five different tests to determine what type of lease they have (lessees classify a lease as a finance lease or an operating lease, whereas lessors classify a lease as a sales-type lease or an operating lease). Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 14289 Edspira
LSE Events | Assessing Global Financial Stability
 
01:08:57
Financial instability can put growth at risk. How should global financial stability issues been analyzed? What is the IMF’s current assessment of global financial stability? During his lecture, Tobias Adrian will discuss the main features of a framework to assess global financial stability in a comprehensive and consistent way. He will also present the analysis of the October 2017 Global Financial Stability Report, which identifies sources of financial instability and the policies to mitigate risks to growth. The report focuses on the interplay between financial and macroeconomic developments, and assesses the degree to which these interactions pose risks that could threaten economic growth. Tobias Adrian, an LSE alumnus, is the Financial Counsellor and Director of the Monetary and Capital Markets Department of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In this capacity, he leads the IMF’s work on financial sector surveillance, monetary and macroprudential policies, financial regulation, debt management, and capital markets. He also oversees capacity building activities in IMF member countries, particularly with regard to the supervision and regulation of financial systems, central banking, monetary and exchange rate regimes, and asset and liability management. Prior to joining the IMF, Dr Adrian was a Senior Vice President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the Associate Director of the Research and Statistics Group. Dr Adrian taught at Princeton University and New York University and has published extensively in economics and finance journals, including the American Economic Review, Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Economics, and Review of Financial Studies. His research spans asset pricing, financial institutions, monetary policy, and financial stability, with a focus on aggregate consequences of capital markets developments. Wouter den Haan is Co-director for the Centre for Macroeconomics and Professor of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Scott Sumner | Economists on the Welfare and Regulatory States | EJW Panel
 
19:18
The welfare state and the regulatory state are two policy areas that rarely elicit converging positions, but is it possible to find an economist who defies this pattern? In the January 2015 issue of Econ Journal Watch, Chief Editor Daniel Klein has prompted contributors and scholars to consider why so few economists argue in favor of one and against the other, and whether they can think of some economists who have done so. *** Daniel Klein is Professor of Economics and JIN Chair at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He is also the chief editor of Econ Journal Watch and the leader of the Adam Smith Program among others at George Mason University. He has published research on a number of issues including spontaneous order, credit reporting, the FDA, government intervention and policy, and the relationship between liberty, dignity, and responsibility. Donald Boudreaux is Professor of Economics, Martha and Nelson Getchell Chair for the Study of Free Market Capitalism, and Senior Fellow with the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He specializes in globalization, trade, law and economics, and antitrust economics. He regularly posts on www.cafehayek.com and has recently published a book with the Fraser Institute titled The Essential Hayek. Scott Sumner is Professor of Economics at Bentley University and the Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair and Program Director of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He specializes in monetary policy, the role of the international gold market in the Great Depression, and the history of macroeconomic thought. In addition to regularly posting on www.themoneyillusion.com, he has been published in journals such as the Journal of Political Economy, Economic Inquiry, and the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking. Jeremy Rabkin is Professor of Law at George Mason University. He is also currently on the Board of Directors for the United States Institute of Peace and the Center for Individual Rights, and the Board of Academic Advisors for the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy and American Enterprise Institute. Prior to joining George Mason University, he was a professor in the Department of Government at Cornell University from 1980 – 2007 and a visiting professor in the Department of Government at Harvard University in 1993. http://www.mercatus.org Stay Connected Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mercatuscenter/ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/mercatus Email: http://www.mercatus.org/newsletters
Views: 1317 Mercatus Center
Tampa Bay Business Journal: March 8, 2013
 
02:36
In this week's Tampa Bay Business Journal segment, editor Alexis Muellner discusses the banking concerns after ten senior administrators left the Florida Office of Financial Regulation, the real economic impact the Republican National Convention had on Tampa, and employee use of social media.
Views: 34 ABC Action News
Ross Levine Interview -- Regulation and Methods
 
23:40
Ross Levine Interview -- Regulation and Methods Ross Levine is the Willis H. Booth Chair in Banking and Finance at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. His research has emphasized financial regulation and economic growth, income inequality and poverty, financial crises, the political economy of financial regulation, and international capital flows. He addresses the lack of incentives for regulators to regulate and methods for assessing financial regulation.
Sheila Bair: Clinton Should Be More Definitive
 
01:40
The former FDIC chief says she would feel better if Hillary Clinton came out with more definitive ideas on financial regulation, like whether to restore the Glass-Steagall Act. Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 114 Wall Street Journal

Nyu admissions essay 2012
Cover letter for demotion
Resume cover letter example australian
Uvm admissions essay sample
24 hour fitness jobs application