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Money Growth and Inflation
 
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Video lecture
Views: 17312 ageconjon
The Money Market- Macroeconomics 4.6
 
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In this video I explain the money market graph with the the demand and supply of money. The graph is used to show the idea of monetary policy and how changing the money supply effects interest rates. Thanks for watching. Please subscribe Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 315705 Jacob Clifford
Quantity Theory of Money
 
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The quantity theory of money is an important tool for thinking about issues in macroeconomics. The equation for the quantity theory of money is: M x V = P x Y What do the variables represent? M is fairly straightforward – it’s the money supply in an economy. A typical dollar bill can go on a long journey during the course of a single year. It can be spent in exchange for goods and services numerous times. In the quantity theory of money, how many times an average dollar is exchanged is its velocity, or V. The price level of goods and services in an economy is represented by P. Finally, Y is all of the finished goods and services sold in an economy – aka real GDP. When you multiply P x Y, the result is nominal GDP. Actually, when you multiply M x V (the money supply times the velocity of money), you also get nominal GDP. M x V is equal to P x Y by definition – it’s an identity equation. You can think about the two sides of the equation like this: the left (M x V) covers the actions of consumers while the right (P x Y) covers the actions of producers. Since everything that is sold is bought by someone, these two sides will remain equal. Up next, we’ll use the quantity theory of money to discuss the causes of inflation. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2jvcIbq Next video: http://bit.ly/2k0ZCny
How Banks Create Money and the Money Multiplier- Macro 4.8
 
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Money doesn't grow on trees, but it does grow in banks. I explain how banks create money and how to use the money multiplier. For more practice go to my website www.ACDCecon.com or watch the unit playlist videos. Please subscribe and leave a comment. You rock! Monetary Policy and Despicable Me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaeIBeJT5hY Video about the Federal Reserve https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXhXnwDANXo Unit playlists. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQkVO2PsxFw
Views: 389213 Jacob Clifford
Macro Unit 2 Summary- Measuring the Economy
 
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Hey, this is Jacob Clifford and welcome to the Macro Unit 2 Summary. This unit is about measuring the economy and covers topics like GDP (1:04), the business cycle (6:15), unemployment (7:28), the types of unemployment, the natural rate of unemployment, inflation (12:14), CPI, GDP deflato (17:59), and the causes of inflation (19:52). It also includes a pretty awesome Bonus Round (11:23). Be sure to subscribe and get the ultimate review packet. Thanks for watching. Get the packet and support ACDCEcon http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Practice Multiple Choice Questions for Macro Unit 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ks5MBWBdmQo Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3... Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF... Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 524687 Jacob Clifford
Money supply: M0, M1, and M2 | The monetary system | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Different ways of measuring the money supply Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/factional-reserve-accounting/v/simple-fractional-reserve-accounting-part-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/fractional-reserve-banking-tut/v/full-reserve-banking?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 326706 Khan Academy
Money supply and demand impacting interest rates | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Examples showing how various factors can affect interest rates Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/income-and-expenditure-topic/MPC-tutorial/v/mpc-and-multiplier?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/interest-price-of-money-tutorial/v/interest-as-rent-for-money?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 243898 Khan Academy
Macro 4.9- Monetary Policy Practice
 
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Mr. Clifford explains how to connect the supply and demand for money to aggregate demand and supply.
Views: 193512 Jacob Clifford
Economic Growth and Inflation
 
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See more videos at: http://talkboard.com.au/ In this video, we look at the relationship between economic growth and inflation in both the short and long terms.
Views: 4096 talkboard.com.au
Introduction to inflation | Inflation - measuring the cost of living | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Basics of price inflation and the CPI (consumer price index) Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/inflation-topic/cost-of-living-tutorial/v/actual-cpi-u-basket-of-goods?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/gdp-topic/piketty-capital/v/piketty-spreadsheet-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 370059 Khan Academy
Quantity theory of money | AP Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Does increasing the money supply impact the price level? Learn about the quantity theory of money in this video. AP(R) Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Macroeconomics is all about how an entire nationÕs performance is determined and improved over time. Learn how factors like unemployment, inflation, interest rates, economic growth and recession are caused and how they affect individuals and society as a whole. We hit the traditional topics from an AP Macroeconomics course, including basic economic concepts, economic indicators, and the business cycle, national income and price determination, the financial sector, the long-run consequences of stabilization policies, and international trade and finance. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy. View more lessons or practice this subject at http://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/ap-macroeconomics/ap-long-run-consequences-of-stabilization-policies/money-growth-and-inflation/v/quantity-theory-of-money-ap-macroeconomics-khan-academy?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apmacroeconomics AP Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Welcome to Economics! In this lesson we'll define Economic and introduce some of the fundamental tools and perspectives economists use to understand the world around us! Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 8732 Khan Academy
Causes of Inflation
 
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In the last video, we learned the quantity theory of money and its corresponding identity equation: M x V = P x Y For a quick refresher: ‌•M is the money supply. ‌•V is the velocity of money. ‌•P is the price level. ‌•And Y is the real GDP. In this video, we’re rewriting the equation slightly to divide both sides by Y and explore the causes behind inflation. What we discover is that a change in P has three possible causes – changes in M, V, or Y. You probably know that prices can change a lot, even over a short period of time. Y, or real GDP, tends to change rather slowly. Even a seemingly small jump or fall in Y, such as 10% in a year, would signal astonishing economic growth or a great depression. Y probably isn’t our usual culprit for inflation. V, or the velocity of money, also tends to be rather stable for an economy. The average dollar in the United States has a velocity of about 7. That may fall or rise slightly, but not enough to influence prices. That leaves us with M. Changes in the money supply are the driving factor behind inflation. Put simply, when more money chases the same amount of goods and services, prices must rise. Can we put this theory to the test? Let’s look at some real-world examples and see if the quantity theory of money holds up. In Peru in 1990, hyperinflation came into full swing. If we track the growth rate of the money supply to the growth rate of prices, we can see that they align almost perfectly on a graph with both clocking in around 6,000% that year. If we plot the growth rates of the money supply along with the growth rates of prices for a many countries over a long stretch of time, we can see the same relationship. We’ll wrap-up the causes of inflation with three principles to keep in mind as we continue exploring this topic: ‌•Money is neutral in the long run: a doubling of the money supply will eventually mean a doubling of the price level. ‌•“Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomena.” – Milton Friedman ‌•Central banks have significant control over a nation’s money supply and inflation rate. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2jR4yKz Next video: http://bit.ly/2jTTTiW
Money and Inflation
 
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Feducation: How are the money supply and inflation related? And what does the Federal Reserve have to do with this relationship? This video reviews the functions of money, features an interactive auction that demonstrates the relationship between the money supply and inflation, then utilizes a simple equation to show how changes in the money supply affect the economy. The video also describes how the Fed uses monetary policy to achieve its dual mandate of maximum employment and price stability.
Draw Me The Economy: Money Supply
 
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Draw Me The Economy is a series of videos explaining the economic news, without political bias. It is a tool offered to all to aid understanding, thanks to the drawings of economic concepts that are part of our daily lives. http://www.drawmetheeconomy.com
Views: 35138 Dessine-moi l'éco
Lecture 16: Inflation, Money Growth and Interest Rates
 
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Topics: Nominal and Real Interest Rates: 0:46 Markets Equilibrium and the Neutrality of Money: 6:42 Output Market Equilibrium and the Real Interest Rates: 15:13
Why Governments Create Inflation
 
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Inflation can carry with it quite a few costs. But some governments, like Zimbabwe under President Robert Mugabe in the early 2000s, will go out of their to way to create inflation. Why? Well, in the Zimbabwe example, the government printed the money and used it to buy goods and services. The ensuing hyperinflation acted as a tax that transferred wealth from the citizens to the government. However, this is a fairly uncommon reason. Inflation doesn’t make for a good tax and it’s a last resort for desperate governments that are otherwise unable to raise funds. There are other benefits to inflation that would make governments want to create it. In the short run, inflation can actually boost economic output. However, as we’ve previously covered, an increase in the money supply leads to an equal increase in prices in the long run. If there’s a recession, governments might create inflation to spur productivity and ease the economic downturn. However, this type of inflationary boosting can be abused. Long-term boosting causes people to simply expect and prepare for it. Reducing inflation is also costly. If the process is reversed and the growth in the money supply decreases, we get disinflation. Unemployment will likely increase in the short run and an economy can go through a recession. But in the long run, prices will adjust as well. Inflation can be a neat trick for governments to boost productivity in an economy. But it can easily get out of hand and has even been likened to a drug. Once you start, you need more and more. And stopping is awfully painful as the economy shrinks. This concludes our section on Inflation and the Quantity Theory of Money. Up next in Principles of Macroeconomics, we’ll be digging into Business Fluctuations. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2lcPkAy Next video: http://bit.ly/2kMc9ub
GDP, Unemployment, Inflation- EconMovies #6: Back to the Future
 
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EconMovies explain economic concepts through movies. In this episode, I use the Back to the Future Trilogy to introduce the concepts of GDP growth, Nominal GDP, Real GDP, unemployment, and inflation. Good luck studying economics. This is heavy Doc!
Views: 243082 Jacob Clifford
Inflation and Bubbles and Tulips: Crash Course Economics #7
 
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In which Adriene and Jacob teach you about how and why prices rise. Sometimes prices rise as a result of inflation, which is a pretty normal thing for economies to do. We'll talk about how across the board prices rise over time, and how economists track inflation. Bubbles are a pretty normal thing for humans to do. One item, like tulips or beanie babies or houses or tech startups experience a rapid rise in prices. This is often accompanied by speculation, a bunch of outrageous profits, and then a nasty crash when the bubble bursts. People get excited about rising prices, and next thing you know, people are trading their life savings for a tulip bulb. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 790657 CrashCourse
Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #5
 
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This week, Adriene and Jacob teach you about macroeconomics. This is the stuff of big picture economics, and the major movers in the economy. Like taxes and monetary policy and inflation and policy. We need this stuff, because if you don't have a big picture of the economy, crashes and panics are more likely. Of course, economics is extremely complex and unpredictable. Today we'll talk about GDP as a measure of a country's economic health, the basics of economic analysis, and even a little about full employment, unemployment Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1143082 CrashCourse
What is Inflation?
 
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Economists constantly refer to inflation and tend to suggest it is a Very Bad Thing. But why exactly, where does it come from and what could one do to tame it? Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Vale Productions http://www.valeproductions.co.uk Music Lanquidity by http://www.purple-planet.com #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 663510 The School of Life
Inflation and the Money Supply
 
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How money supply affects Inflation. http://inflationdata.com/Inflation/Inflation_Rate/CurrentInflation.asp As the money supply grows it dilutes the purchasing power of the original currency so each dollar buys less or in other words prices go up or are "inflated". At InflationData we track not only the Government inflation estimates but also inflation information from independent sources like Gallup and the Billion Price Project. We calculate inflation to two decimal places while the government only tracks it to a single decimal place thus our numbers provide a "finer view" and may help to determine turning points quicker. We also present charts of inflation adjusted prices such as Oil, Gasoline, Natural Gas, Electricity, Gold and the NYSE and NASDAQ. By looking at the inflation adjusted prices you can tell how price increases relate to overall price increases due to increases in the money supply i.e. monetary inflation compared to prices increasing due to normal supply and demand issues.
Views: 7078 Tim McMahon
Understanding Money and Inflation Part 1 (1 of 4)
 
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http://www.evndirect.com/ Modern economics is a subject that today's students must understand in order to protect their tomorrows. Inflation, the creation of money, and the regulation of the economy are explained.
Views: 55090 LongPigJason
Employment and Unemployment - Unemployment and Inflation (1/3) | Principles of Macroeconomics
 
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Employment and Unemployment is the focus of this video. The following subtopics are covered in the series: - why unemployment is a problem - relevant definitions - labour market indicators - additional definitions of unemployment - frictional unemployment - structural unemployment - cyclical unemployment - natural unemployment - why inflation and deflation are problems - the consumer price index - calculating CPI - measuring the rate of inflation - evaluation of the CPI - alternative price indices to the CPI - core inflation unemployment in canada 2015 | unemployment in Canada | unemployment rate | unemployment boots | unemployment documentary | unemployment song | unemployment benefits | unemployment and its natural rate
Views: 31374 Inspirare
Macro 3.3- Long Run Aggregate Supply, Recession, and Inflation (LRAS)
 
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In this video I explain the most important graph in your macroeconomics class. The aggregate demand and supply model. Make sure that you understand the idea of the long run aggregate supply and how to draw a recessionary gap and inflationary gap. Keep in mind that the "long run" is not a specific amount of time. The long run refers to enough time for resource prices (like wages) to adjust when there is a change in price level.Thanks for watching. Please subscribe. If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 460496 Jacob Clifford
Measuring the Macroeconomic Objectives: Economic Growth, Unemployment and Inflation
 
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Macroeconomics provides government policymakers with a set of tools that can be employed to help achieve certain macroeconomic objectives deemed desirable for a nation. For an economy to be considered healthy, three objectives must be met: -Economic growth: defined as an increase in the nation's output of goods and services over time -Low unemployment: meaning that nearly everyone who is willing and able to work should be able to find a job, and -Low inflation: meaning that the average price level of the nation's goods and services should not increase too rapidly over time. Measuring these three objectives requires the use of some simple mathematical formulas. Once they are known, we can use the basic production possibilities curve diagram to illustrate their effect on a nation's potential output and its current equilibrium level of output. This lesson will define the three macroeconomic objectives, show how it can be determined whether or not they are being achieved, and use a PPC model to illustrate them. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 64314 Jason Welker
Money Supply and Inflation
 
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http://investing.meetup.com/21 - New York Investing meetup organizer Daryl Montgomery compares money supply growth now to what it was in the high inflation 1970s. The New York Investing meetup is a group of 1800 independent traders and investors that provides investing education and analysis to the public. We also have an associated blog, "The Helicopter Economics Investing Guide" at: http://nyinvestingmeetup.blogspot.com.
Views: 12079 NYInvestingMeetup
The Money Multiplier
 
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When you deposit money into a bank, do you know what happens to it? It doesn’t simply sit there. Banks are actually allowed to loan out up to 90% of their deposits. For every $10 that you deposit, only $1 is required to stay put. This practice is known as fractional reserve banking. Now, it’s fairly rare for a bank to only have 10% in reserves, and the number fluctuates. Since checkable deposits are part of the U.S. money supplies, fractional reserve banking, as you might have guessed, can have a big impact on these supplies. This is where the money multiplier comes into play. The money multiplier itself is straightforward: it equals 1 divided by the reserve ratio. If reserves are at 10%, the minimum amount required by the Fed, then the money multiplier is 10. So if a bank has $1 million in checkable deposits, it has $10 million to work with for stuff like loans and reserves. Now, typically, the money multiplier is more like 3, because banks can always hold more in reserves than the minimum 10%. When the money multiplier is higher, like during a boom, this gives the Fed more leverage to move M1 and M2 with a small change in reserves. But when the multiplier is lower, such as during a recession, the Fed has less leverage and must push harder to wield its indirect influence over M1 and M2. Next up, we’ll take a closer look at how the Fed controls the money supply and how that has changed since the Great Recession. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/2eHWWtC Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2utp1IH Next video: http://bit.ly/2udpA7U
The Phillips Curve (Macro Review) Macro 3.4
 
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In this video I explain the Phillips Curve and the relationship between inflation and unemploymnet. Remeber that there are two curves the long run curve and the short run curve. Thanks for watching. Please subscribe. If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-pack... Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3... Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF... Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 475259 Jacob Clifford
Costs of Inflation: Price Confusion and Money Illusion
 
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The inflation rate can be somewhat volatile and unpredictable. For example, let’s take the period between 1964 and 1983 in the U.S. The inflation rate jumped around from 1.3% in 1964 to 5.9% in 1970, and all the way up to 14% in in 1980, before dipping back down to 3% in 1983. These dramatic changes, though still fairly mild in the realm of inflation, caught people off-guard. Peru’s inflation rates in the late 1980s through the early 1990s were on even more of a rollercoaster. Clocking in at 77% in 1986, its inflation rate was already quite high. But by 1990, it had jumped to 7,500%, only to fall to 73% a mere two years later. High and volatile inflation rates can wreak havoc on the price system where prices act as signals. If the price of oil rises, it signals scarcity of that product and allows consumers to search for alternatives. But with high and volatile inflation, there’s noise interfering with this price signal. Is oil really more scarce? Or are prices simply rising? This leads to price confusion – people are unsure of what to do and the price system is less effective at coordinating market activity. Money illusion is another problem associated with inflation. You’ve likely experienced this yourself. Think of something that you’ve noticed has gotten more expensive over the course of your lifetime, such as a ticket to the movies. Is it really that going out the movies has become a pricier activity, or is it the result of inflation? It’s difficult for us to make all of the calculations to accurately compare rising costs. This is known as “money illusion” – or when we mistake a change in the nominal price with a change in the real price. Inflation, especially when it’s high and volatile, can result in some costly problems for everyone. Next up, we’ll look at how it redistributes wealth and can break down financial intermediation. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2jnFcVR Next video: http://bit.ly/2jnFlZp
Milton Friedman Speaks: Money and Inflation (B1230) - Full Video
 
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Inflation is blamed on many things. But it has only one cause: It is a monetary phenomenon. Inflation occurs when the quantity of money increases faster than the quantity of goods. Why does the money supply increase? Very often, it does so to enable the government to pay its bills without raising taxes. There's only one real cure for inflation. It is a cure that's easy to describe but difficult to apply: The government must reduce spending and print less money. The alternatives are both recession and double-digit inflation. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org/ Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net/ Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv/
Y1/IB 31) Monetary Policy (Interest Rates, Money Supply and Exchange Rate)
 
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AS/IB 21) Monetary Policy (Interest Rates, Money Supply and Exchange Rate) - An understanding of how monetary policy works with reference to central bank inflation targeting as well. Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 98357 EconplusDal
Understanding economic growth | AP Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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In this video, learn about the definition of economic growth and how growth occurs. AP(R) Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Macroeconomics is all about how an entire nationÕs performance is determined and improved over time. Learn how factors like unemployment, inflation, interest rates, economic growth and recession are caused and how they affect individuals and society as a whole. We hit the traditional topics from an AP Macroeconomics course, including basic economic concepts, economic indicators, and the business cycle, national income and price determination, the financial sector, the long-run consequences of stabilization policies, and international trade and finance. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy. View more lessons or practice this subject at http://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/ap-macroeconomics/ap-long-run-consequences-of-stabilization-policies/economic-growth/v/understanding-economic-growth-ap-macroeconomics-khan-academy?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apmacroeconomics AP Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Welcome to Economics! In this lesson we'll define Economic and introduce some of the fundamental tools and perspectives economists use to understand the world around us! Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 8077 Khan Academy
Alternative Theories of Economic Growth and Inflation [Segment 8]
 
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Taught by John Smithin Assisted by Fredrick Zhou There are two alternative views about how to promote economic growth. We develop two generic growth equations, each including the trade balance, the primary budget deficit, and the domestic investment/savings balance, to explain the underlying arguments. The first illustrates a “Keynes’s-type” theory, focusing on demand growth. This validates the idea that fiscal expansion leads to growth, that investment drives saving (the “paradox of thrift”) and that a trade surplus leads to growth (“monetary mercantalism”). The second approach leads to a “classics-type” theory, stressing capital accumulation and supply. However, this yields seriously anomalous results, and does not provide a solid foundation for the classical theories of trade, saving, and public finance. There are also multiple theories of inflation, those descended from the quantity theory, from Wicksell, and also various theories of “cost push” or “conflict” inflation. If money is endogenous there is plenty of scope for the latter. Also the parameters of both the money demand and (endogenous) money supply functions must be relevant. These are literally measures of “liquidity preference” - on both sides of the money market.
The business cycle | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
11:16
The business cycle and how it may be driven by emotion Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/monetary-and-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/historic-ad-as-scenarios/v/cost-push-inflation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 287963 Khan Academy
What's all the Yellen About? Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve: Crash Course Economics #10
 
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This week on Crash Course Economics, we're talking about monetary policy. The reality of the world is that the United States (and most of the world's economies) are, to varying degrees, Keynesian. When things go wrong, economically, the central bank of the country intervenes to try aand get things back on track. In the United States, the Federal Reserve is the organization that steps in to use monetary policy to steer the economy. When the Fed, as it's called, does step in, there are a few different tacks it can take. The Fed can change interest rates, or it can change the money supply. This is pretty interesting stuff, and it's what we're getting into today. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 730185 CrashCourse
Econ Slide 10-2: Inflation and Money Growth
 
01:04:34
Piyapas Tharavanij [email protected] Economics (in Thai language) College of Management, Mahidol University Bangkok, Thailand www.cmmu.mahidol.ac.th
Views: 68 Piyapas Tharavanij
The Quantity Theory of Money
 
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This video introduces the quantity equation and the quantity theory of money, which shows the relationship between changes in the money supply and changes in prices. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 116561 jodiecongirl
Monetary Policy: The Negative Real Shock Dilemma
 
03:58
Imagine a negative real shock, like an oil crisis, just hit the economy. How should the Fed respond? Decreasing the money supply will help with inflation, but make growth worse. Increasing the money supply will improve growth, but inflation will climb higher. What’s the Fed to do?! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/2hZVx2G Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2i0KDcU Next video: http://bit.ly/2uDomYF Help translate this video: https://amara.org/en/teams/mruniversity/
Monetary and fiscal policy | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
08:54
Basic mechanics of monetary and fiscal policy Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/tax-lever-of-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/business-cycle-tutorial/v/the-business-cycle?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 631164 Khan Academy
Keynesian economics | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
12:05
Contrasting Keynesian and Classical Thinking Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/keynesian-thinking/v/risks-of-keynesian-thinking?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/tax-lever-of-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 691185 Khan Academy
Zimbabwe and Hyperinflation: Who Wants to Be a Trillionaire?
 
04:20
How would you like to pay $417.00 per sheet of toilet paper? Sound crazy? It’s not as crazy as you may think. Here’s a story of how this happened in Zimbabwe. Around 2000, Robert Mugabe, the President of Zimbabwe, was in need of cash to bribe his enemies and reward his allies. He had to be clever in his approach, given that Zimbabwe’s economy was doing lousy and his people were starving. Sow what did he do? He tapped the country’s printing presses and printed more money. Clever, right? Not so fast. The increase in money supply didn’t equate to an increase in productivity in the Zimbabwean economy, and there was little new investment to create new goods. So, in effect, you had more money chasing the same goods. In other words, you needed more dollars to buy the same stuff as before. Prices began to rise -- drastically. As prices rose, the government printed more money to buy the same goods as before. And the cycle continued. In fact, it got so out of hand that by 2006, prices were rising by over 1,000% per year! Zimbabweans became millionaires, but a million dollars may have only been enough to buy you one chicken during the hyperinflation crisis. It all came crashing down in 2008 when -- given that the Zimbabwean dollar basically ceased to exist -- Mugabe was forced to legalize transactions in foreign currencies. Hyperinflation isn’t unique to Zimbabwe. It has occurred in other countries such as Yugoslavia, China, and Germany throughout history. In future videos, we’ll take a closer look at inflation and what causes it. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2hNkAFy Next video: http://bit.ly/2j4niXI
What is Monetary Policy?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Monetary Policy”. Monetary policy is one of the ways that a government attempts to control the economy. If the money supply grows too fast, the rate of inflation will increase; if the growth of the money supply is slowed too much, then economic growth may also slow. The actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and rate of growth of the money supply, which in turn affects interest rates. Monetary policy is maintained through actions such as increasing the interest rate, or changing the amount of money banks need to keep in the vault. The term used, is primarily used, in reference to the US Federal Reserve but has gained global recognition as central banks around the world reacted to the financial crisis and relied on actions by their specific banks to help the economic problems. The ECB has been in the headline over the last few years as Mr. Draghi adopted monetary policy to help support the faltering Eurozone economy. The regulation of the money supply and interest rates by a central bank, such as the Federal Reserve Board in the U.S., in order to control inflation and stabilize currency. Monetary policy is one the two ways the government can impact the economy. By impacting the effective cost of money, the Federal Reserve can affect the amount of money that is spent by consumers and businesses. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
Nominal vs. Real GDP
 
07:41
"Are you better off today than you were 4 years ago? What about 40 years ago?" These sorts of questions invite a different kind of query: what exactly do we mean, when we say “better off?” And more importantly, how do we know if we’re better off or not? To those questions, there’s one figure that can shed at least a partial light: real GDP. In the previous video, you learned about how to compute GDP. But what you learned to compute was a very particular kind: the nominal GDP, which isn’t adjusted for inflation, and doesn’t account for increases in the population. A lack of these controls produces a kind of mirage. For example, compare the US nominal GDP in 1950. It was roughly $320 billion. Pretty good, right? Now compare that with 2015’s nominal GDP: over $17 trillion. That’s 55 times bigger than in 1950! But wait. Prices have also increased since 1950. A loaf of bread, which used to cost a dime, now costs a couple dollars. Think back to how GDP is computed. Do you see how price increases impact GDP? When prices go up, nominal GDP might go up, even if there hasn’t been any real growth in the production of goods and services. Not to mention, the US population has also increased since 1950. As we said before: without proper controls in place, even if you know how to compute for nominal GDP, all you get is a mirage. So, how do you calculate real GDP? That’s what you’ll learn today. In this video, we’ll walk you through the factors that go into the computation of real GDP. We’ll show you how to distinguish between nominal GDP, which can balloon via rising prices, and real GDP—a figure built on the production of either more goods and services, or more valuable kinds of them. This way, you’ll learn to distinguish between inflation-driven GDP, and improvement-driven GDP. Oh, and we’ll also show you a handy little tool named FRED — the Federal Reserve Economic Data website. FRED will help you study how real GDP has changed over the years. It’ll show you what it looks like during healthy times, and during recessions. FRED will help you answer the question, “If prices hadn’t changed, how much would GDP truly have increased?” FRED will also show you how to account for population, by helping you compute a key figure: real GDP per capita. Once you learn all this, not only will you see past the the nominal GDP-mirage, but you’ll also get an idea of how to answer our central question: "Are we better off than we were all those years ago?" Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/24pzD7X Next video: http://bit.ly/1TGgR8r Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/H0PX/
When the functions of money break down: Hyperinflation | AP Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
11:43
To illustrate what the functions of money are, it can help to look at circumstances where those functions break down. Hyperinflation, in which prices of things increase really really fast, is one such example. Created by Grant Sanderson. View more lessons or practice this subject at http://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/ap-macroeconomics/ap-financial-sector/definition-measurement-and-functions-of-money-ap/v/when-the-functions-of-money-break-down-hyperinflation?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apmacroeconomics AP Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Welcome to Economics! In this lesson we'll define Economic and introduce some of the fundamental tools and perspectives economists use to understand the world around us! Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 31924 Khan Academy
Inflation and CPI Practice- Macro 2.8
 
16:31
Hey econ students! Thank you for watching my videos. I really appreciate it. In this video I quickly go over the difference between the inflation rate and the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and then give you several practice problems. Be sure to pause the video and try it on your own. Also, keep in mind that CPI is all about the BASE...year. Please subscribe! Get the Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 107733 Jacob Clifford
Monetary Policy#1: Money multiplier, Fractional Reserve, High Powered v. Narrow v. Broad Money
 
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- So far in the budget and economic survey series 2017 (BES17): we've covered the evolution of money with special focus on digital payment in the light of de-monetization. - Now we shall move to monetary policy- tools, review of last one year's policies and its limitations. - But, first we must learn how can a Central Bank control money supply and liquidity in the system? - In his book the General theory of employment, interest and money, the famous Economist John Maynard Keynes listed the motives for which people demand and keep money in liquid form 1) transaction motive 2) precautionary motive and 3) speculative motive- also known as the asset demand of money. - We measure the money supply thus kept as "M1"- which is currency with public plus demand deposits in the banks. Because of the fractional reserve system, Every “R” reserve generates “1/r” new money - What is money multiplier, why is it said that in a functional economy, money multiplier is always greater than one? - What is M0: reserve money or high powered money? Why is it called liability of RBI? - Measures of money supply: M0, M1, M2, M3, M4. what is broad money and what is narrow money? Which one has the highest liquidity? - How can RBI combat inflation and deflation? What type of policy strategy should it use against these two scenarios? What is easy money policy, cheap money policy, dovish money policy vs. tight money policy, dear money policy, Hawkish money policy. - Faculty Name: You know who - all Powerpoint available at http://mrunal.org/powerpoint - Exam-Utility: UPSC IAS IPS Civil service exam, Prelims, CSAT, Mains, Staff selection SSC-CGL, IBPS-PO/MT, IBPS-CWE, SBI PO & Clerk, RBI and other banking exams; LIC, EPFO, FCI & other PSU exams; CDS, CAPF and other defense services exams; GPSC, MPPCS, RPSC & other State PCS services exams with Indian Economy, Budget, Banking, Public Finance in its syllabus- with descriptive questions and answer writing.
Views: 280391 Mrunal Patel
Inflation vs Deflation | Inflation Part 01| Indian Economy
 
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How to Prepare Indian Economy for UPSC CSE Prelims 2019 ? Video Link : https://youtu.be/SYuTBEMmzJ4 To Join Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYPRELIMS To Join Economy Mains Channel https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYMAINS Economy Previous Year Questions Link : https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zmjyKUMAttVddsQ6wInX1zGBKfy-jU0q Learn complete concept of Inflation in Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.

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