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Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1757443 CrashCourse
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2320263 Khan Academy
The Chemical Bond: Covalent vs. Ionic and Polar vs. Nonpolar
 
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Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, James Bond, so many bonds! What dictates which kind of bond will form? Electronegativity values, of course. Let's go through each type and what they're all about. To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 273989 Professor Dave Explains
Polar Covalent Bonds and Nonpolar Covalent bonds, Ionic Bonding - Types of Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the types of chemical bonds such as polar covalent bonds, nonpolar covalent bonds and ionic bonds. It discusses the difference between ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Ionic bonds can be identified by looking for a metal combined with a nonmetal. Covalent bonds typically occur among 2 or more nonmetals. Covalent bonding involves a sharing of electrons and ionic bonding forms as a result of a transfer of electrons from the metal to the nonmetal producing ions with opposite charge which are attracted to each other. The electrostatic force of attraction produces the ionic bond that holds the cations and anions together. Polar covalent bonds have unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms where as nonpolar covalent bonding have a relatively equal sharing of electrons between the atoms attached to the bond. Polar covalent bonds typically have an electronegativity difference of 0.5 or more where as nonpolar covalent bonds have a value difference of 0.4 or less. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Is it an Ionic, Covalent or Polar Covalent Bond?
 
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How to tell if a bond is Ionic, Covalent or Polar Covalent. You have to calculate the difference in electronegativities between the atoms ... the difference tell you which you have!
Views: 238193 chemistNATE
What are Ionic Bonds?  | The Chemistry Journey | FuseSchool
 
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In this video you'll learn the basics about Ionic Bonds. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Naming Ionic and Molecular Compounds | How to Pass Chemistry
 
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Naming compounds have never been so simple! With my strategy and step by step examples, you will be naming compounds like a pro in no time! This video explains every single type of ionic compound rule and covalent compound rule you will see and there are even practice problems to lock in what you just learned. 📗 FREE CHEMISTRY SURVIVAL GUIDE https://melissa.help/freechemguide 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️GOT A QUESTION? ASK ME HERE https://melissa.help/me 👉 SHOP MY STEP-BY-STEP CHEMISTRY NOTES👈 https://melissamaribel.com/ -Thermochemistry Notes https://melissa.help/thermonotes -Acids and Bases Notes https://melissa.help/acidbase1notes -Naming Compounds and Acids Notes https://melissa.help/namingnotes -Dimensional Analysis, Significant Figures, and Density Notes https://melissa.help/sigfignotes -Gas Laws Notes https://melissa.help/gaslawsnotes -Stoichiometry Notes https://melissa.help/stoichnotes -Redox Reactions Notes https://melissa.help/redoxnotes -Molarity Notes https://melissa.help/molaritynotes -Limiting Reactants Notes https://melissa.help/limreactnotes -Lewis Structures Notes https://melissa.help/lewisnotes -Kinetics Notes https://melissa.help/kineticsnotes 🧡SHOW YOUR SUPPORT ON PATREON https://www.patreon.com/melissamaribel 👍MELISSA'S FAVORITES ON AMAZON https://www.amazon.com/shop/chemistrywithmelissamaribel --OTHER RESOURCES TO HELP YOU GET THROUGH SCHOOL-- 🙌 This was my go-to homework help when I was in school. Chegg Study is one of my favorites. https://che.gg/melissamaribelstudy 📚 I made the mistake of buying all of my textbooks, I wish I had the option of renting them. Thankfully you do, with Chegg Textbook Rentals. https://che.gg/melissamaribelrentals 💰 If you bought a textbook and don’t want the hassle of selling it, Chegg can do the work for you, with Chegg Buyback. https://che.gg/melissamaribelbuyback 📝 QUICKSTUDY REFERENCE GUIDES 📕 CHEMISTRY BREAKDOWN AND REVIEW https://amzn.to/2t50xWx 📙 CHEMISTRY EQUATIONS AND ANSWERS https://amzn.to/2MPjC88 📘 CHEMISTRY TERMINOLOGY https://amzn.to/2t9cv1o DISCLAIMER: Some links in the description are affiliate links, which means that if you buy from those links, I’ll receive a small commission. This helps support the channel and allows me to continue making videos like this. Thanks for the support! 💁‍♀️ HI I'M MELISSA MARIBEL I help students pass Chemistry. I used to struggle with this subject, so when I finally graduated with a bachelor's degree in Chemistry, I became a tutor so that you wouldn't have to struggle like I did. I know that with the right help, YOU CAN LEARN ANYTHING! 👋 FOLLOW ME Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hellomelissam/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hellomelissam/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hellomelissam Practice problems with step by step answers: http://bit.ly/2YGSkX5 TIMESTAMPS 1:13 Naming Strategy 1:53 Ionic Compound Naming Rules 9:49 Covalent Compound Naming Rules Example 11:49 Practice problems ___________________________________________________________________ Music: [China Electro] China-P (Morocco No Copyright music) - https://youtu.be/uDkddvltoUk Music: The Rover - S Strong https://youtu.be/DhBCxKQPHiI ___________________________________________________________________
Views: 330916 Melissa Maribel
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2437985 CrashCourse
Ionic Bond | #aumsum
 
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Ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metallic atom to a non-metallic atom. Sodium Chloride: Oppositely charged sodium and chloride ions are held by a strong electrostatic force of attraction known as Ionic Bond.
Views: 1199132 It's AumSum Time
How atoms bond - George Zaidan and Charles Morton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-atoms-bond-george-zaidan-and-charles-morton Atoms can (and do) bond constantly; it's how they form molecules. Sometimes, in an atomic tug-of-war, one atom pulls electrons from another, forming an ionic bond. Atoms can also play nicely and share electrons in a covalent bond. From simple oxygen to complex human chromosome 13, George Zaidan and Charles Morton break down the humble chemical bond. Lesson by George Zaidan and Charles Morton, animation by Bevan Lynch.
Views: 411115 TED-Ed
Ionic and Covalent Bonds Made Easy
 
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Simple explanation of Ionic and Covalent Bonds music from bensound.com sunny day from soundbible.com wind from soundbible.com
Views: 89813 Got Science?
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1415459 It's AumSum Time
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1055860 Tyler DeWitt
Types Of Chemical Bonds - What Are Chemical Bonds - Covalent Bonds And Ionic Bonds - What Are Ions
 
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In this video we discuss how chemical bonds are formed, we cover ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Chemical bonding is important in many different functions of the body. Transcript and notes The interactions of 2 or more atoms mainly occur at the outermost shell, or energy level. The result of these interactions results in a chemical reaction. In atoms that have fewer or more than 8 electrons in their outermost energy level, reactions occur that result in the loss, gain, or sharing of electrons with another atom to satisfy the octet rule. The octet rule means that elements tend to combine so that each atom has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. This results in the formation of structures such as crystals or molecules. Two atoms of oxygen can combine with one atom of carbon to form carbon dioxide or CO2. There are two main types of chemical bonds, ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Ionic bonds are bonds where the transfer of electrons takes place. Let’s see how this type of bond works. So, here we have a sodium atom, which has an atomic number of 11, meaning it has 11 protons in its nucleus and 11 electrons in its shells or energy levels. Shell one has 2 electrons, shell 2 has 8 electrons and shell 3 has 1 electron. And here we have a chlorine atom, which has an atomic number of 17, so 17 protons and 17 electrons. It has 2 electrons in shell one, 8 in shell 2 and 7 in shell 3. We know that atoms want to have 8 electrons in their outer shell, so Sodium can give up one electron, and now it has 8 electrons in its outer shell, and chlorine can take that electron from sodium and that will give it 8 electrons in its outer shell. Since the sodium atom gave up an electron it now has 11 protons, which are positively charged, and 10 electrons which are negatively charged. This results in the formation of a sodium ion with a positive charge. An ion is an atom or molecule with a net electrical charge due to the loss or gain of an electron. Since the chlorine atom gained an electron, and now has 17 protons and 18 electrons, it is a chlorine ion with a negative charge. The positively charged sodium ion is now attracted to the negatively charged chlorine ion, and NaCl or table salt is formed. This is an ionic bond. So, ionic bonding is when an electron transfer takes place and generates 2 oppositely charged ions. Now for covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are formed by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by the outer energy levels or shells of two atoms. The 4 major elements of the body, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen almost always form covalent bonds by sharing electrons. So, for instance, 2 hydrogen atoms can bond by sharing a pair of electrons. Hydrogen is one of the exceptions to the octet rule of having 8 electrons in the outer shell, because it only has one shell. Let’s look at carbon dioxide or co2 again, which form a covalent bond. Oxygen has an atomic mass of 8, so 8 protons, and 8 electrons, 2 in its inner shell and 6 in its outer shell, so, oxygen atoms want 2 more electrons for their outer shell. Carbon has an atomic mass of 6, 6 protons and 6 electrons, 2 in the inner shell and 4 in the outer shell, so it wants 4 more electrons for its outer shell. They can make each other happy by sharing what they have. Oxygen atom number 1 can share 2 of its electrons and the carbon atom can share 2 of its electrons with oxygen atom number one, making oxygen atom number one happy. And oxygen atom number 2 can come in and like oxygen atom number one it can share two of its electrons and the carbon atom has 2 more of its own electrons that it can share with oxygen atom number 2. So now all 3 atoms are happy. By sharing 2 pairs of electrons in this situation a double bond has been formed, and double bonds are important in chemical reactions.
Views: 5086 Whats Up Dude
Types of Bond: Ionic, Covalent, Coordinate, and Hydrogen Bonds
 
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Types of Bond in chemistry are explained in this video. The explanation of chemical bonding and different types of chemical bonds that are explained in this video include ionic bonds, covalent bonds, coordinate bonds, and hydrogen bonds. Ionic Bond: Ionic bonding is seen when two atoms form a bond by donating or accepting electrons. In this type of chemical bonding, there is an electrostatic attraction between the ions which are oppositely charged. Covalent Bond: In covalent bonding, two atoms share electrons to be able to attain the configuration of their nearest noble gas. It is also called a molecular bond and is characterized by electrons sharing between atoms. Coordinate bond: In the case of coordinate bonding, both the electrons that form the bond come from the same atom. Coordinate bond is also known as a coordinate covalent bond or a dative covalent bond. Hydrogen Bond: Hydrogen bonding is a type of electrostatic attraction and is seen when a hydrogen atom which is bonded to a highly electronegative atom (like Nitrogen, Oxygen, Fluorine) comes close to another adjacent atom having a lone pair of electrons. Get more information about the types of bond here- https://byjus.com/chemistry/ionic-covalent-and-coordinate-bond/ Thank you for watching. If you liked this video, please subscribe to our channel and press the like button. Click on the bell icon to turn on notifications and you will never miss out on our latest videos! Explore more content like this on our channel. Still have a doubt about this topic? Or Have an idea/ suggestion for a new video? Please comment below.
Views: 26821 BYJU'S
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 40935 Socratica
Introduction to Ionic Bonding and Covalent Bonding
 
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This crash course chemistry video tutorial explains the main concepts between ionic bonds found in ionic compounds and polar & nonpolar covalent bonding found in molecular compounds. This video contains plenty of notes, examples, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Ionic Bonds - Transfer of Valence Electrons 2. Electrostatic Force of Attraction In Ionic Bonding 3. Ionic Compounds - Metals and Nonmetals 4. Molecular Compounds - 2 or More Nonmetals 5. Polar Covalent Bonding - Unequal Sharing of Electrons 6. Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Equal Sharing of Electrons 7. Polarized Compounds - Dipole Moment and Charge Separation 8. Electronegativity and Charge Distribution 9. Metal Cations vs Nonmetal Anions
GCSE Science Chemistry (9-1) Covalent bonding 1
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ This video is for the new GCSE specifications (levels 1-9) for all exam boards. In this video, we start looking at covalent bonding. We look at how the atoms are covalently bonded in a hydrogen molecule, a chlorine molecule and in a molecule of hydrogen chloride.
Views: 165576 Freesciencelessons
The Different Types of Chemical Bonding (Animation)
 
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A simple overview of the four types of bonding. Please be wary that this a basic level guide and this is still a hotly debated topic in chemistry. In the future, I may make an advanced guide. Electronegativity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQsthVHpdzY Like, comment & subscribe!
Views: 1226 Elements by Dan
Class 10 CHEMICAL BONDING | Ionic /Electrovalent Bonding | Covalent Bonding | Polar and Non Polar |
 
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To support me in my journey you can donate ([email protected] 9161123482) or Alakh Pandey ,Bank of Baroda, Rajrooppur, Allahabad,U.P IFSC: BARB0RAJROO Account No: 19210100020819 A small amount of Rs 100 even will be of great help. Follow us on: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/physicswallah/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/physicswallah Class 10 CHEMICAL BONDING | Ionic /Electrovalent Bonding | Covalent Bonding | Polar and Non Polar https://youtu.be/ZcmzabBVLh8 CoOrDiNaTe BoNdInG : ICSE 10th CHEMISTRy : CHEMICAL BONDING https://youtu.be/PfVHYS3oC_4
Ionic and covalent bonding animation
 
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Ionic bonding formed when one atom has sufficient strength of attraction to remove ion from the other atom. Covalent bonding occurs when neither atom has sufficient strength to remove the other atom's electron. They would instead share electrons to form stable configurations of electrons.
Views: 1240261 kosasihiskandarsjah
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 262094 RicochetScience
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 94533 Whats Up Dude
GCSE Chemistry Revision Ionic Bonding 1
 
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GCSE Chemistry Revision Ionic Bonding 1 You can watch all my videos at www.freesciencelessons.co.uk In this video, we start looking at ionic bonding. We learn how electrons are transferred during ionic bonding and what is meant by an ion.
Views: 83024 Freesciencelessons
Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds
 
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This video is Awesome! Understand Bonding Like Never Before. Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds - This video shows how to determine the type of bond that will form based on electronegativity values. The difference in electronegativity values result in the bond being ionic, non polar covalent or polar covalent. Ionic bonds result from the transfer of electrons, polar covalent from the uneven sharing of electrons and non polar covalent bonds from the even sharing of electrons. Tune in for the video on Polar Molecules.
Views: 130849 sciencepost
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
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Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1510671 CrashCourse
Types of Chemical Bonds Revisited
 
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*View in 720p for best quality!*
Views: 870 Ben's Chem Videos
[Hindi] Chemical Bonding Easy Explanation || Ionic Bond || covalent bond || Metallic bond
 
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HELLO GENIUS ...... IN THIS VIDEO WE LEARN ABOUT CHEMICAL BONDING BASICS HOW THEY DISCOVERED ,HOW THEY INTERACT WITH EACH OTHER, HOW MANY TYPES ARE THERE . IN THE VIDEO WE COVER THE BASIS OF THERE TYPES ALSO SO YOU CAN EASILY LEARN IT WITH THE SIMPLE EXPLANATION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BE CURIOUS BE GENIUS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Thanks for watching
Views: 43551 uScientist
Chemical Bonds
 
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This clip provides an overview of chemical bonds, explaining that a chemical bond is not a physical structure but an energy relationship that involves interactions between the electrons of the reacting atoms. The clip also discusses the various types of chemical bonds (ionic, covalent and hydrogen).
Views: 2090 INTELECOM
Carbon and its Compounds | Bonding in Carbon | Covalent Bonds
 
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CBSE Class 10 Science - Carbon and its Compounds - What is covalent bonding and why Carbon shares electrons? What are Electrovalent and Covalent compounds and difference between them? Atoms can share, gain or Loose electrons to stable their Octates. So the compounds formed by gain or loss of electrons is called as the electrovalent compound and covalent compounds are formed by sharing of electrons. Carbon has an atomic number of 6 and its electronic configuration will be 2 and 4. So to be stale carbon has to either loss 4 electrons or gain 4 electrons. So the carbon shares the electrons with other atoms. So Covalent bonding is mutual sharing of electrons so as to achieve a stable electronic configuration. Hence carbon has co-valency of 4 and will be tetravalent. About PrepOngo: Best Online Learning App which provides CBSE class 10 interactive video lectures, NCERT solutions, written study material, solved examples, in chapter quizzes and practice problems for Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and Mathematics. We try to help the students understand lessons by visualising the concepts through illustrative and interactive videos, practice from large question banks and evaluate and improve yourself continuously. Online Live courses are also offered for CBSE boards, JEE Mains, JEE-Advanced, NEET and Board preparation for class 10, 11 and 12 For all CBSE class 10 Science and Maths video lectures download the Android App: https://goo.gl/HJwkhw Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://goo.gl/KSsWP2
Views: 51283 PrepOnGo
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
Covalent Bond
 
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Views: 92027 DeltaStep
Matric part 1 Chemistry, Types of Chemical Bond - Ch 4 - 9th Class Chemistry
 
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ilmkidunya.com has brought to you Lecture of Sibghat Ullah on "9th Class Chemistry Chapter 4 Structure of Molecules. Topic 4.3 Types of Chemical Bond". In this video following sub topics have been taught: - 4.3.1 Ionic Bond For more videos of Sibghat Ullah visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study , https://www.instutor.com This lecture is specially recorded for students of 9th class, 9th class from all Punjab Boards and is based on the current curriculum of study for Chemistry book. All these lectures are conducted in Urdu/English medium to facilitate Pakistani students.
Views: 33748 ilmkidunya
Chemistry - Chemical Bonding: The Covalent Bond
 
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This is the 2nd lesson in the series, "Chemical Bonding." The lesson demonstrates how to use models to explain how a covalent bond forms and how to identify different types of covalent bonds. Source: Mindset Network
Views: 5077 EducationCommonsRW
Types of covalent bonds
 
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Views: 5210 Anya Downey
How Does Water Bond - Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of water, when learning about covalent bonding within properties of matter. Water is made from one oxygen atom and two hydrogens. The oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell, but it really wants to have 8 to have a full shell. The hydrogens have one outer shell electron, but want to have two. The atoms share their electrons, forming covalent bonds. So all three atoms have full outer shells, and create a water molecule. Water has two covalent bonds. In water, the bonding electrons spend most of their time nearer the oxygen atom, because it is more ELECTRONEGATIVE. This means that it is electron withdrawing. As the negatively charged electrons are nearer the oxygen atom, the oxygen atom becomes a little bit negative itself, while the hydrogens become a little positive. This is called delta positive and delta negative. Water doesn’t just have any old covalent bonds; it has what we call POLAR COVALENT bonds and is a POLAR molecule. This is really important as it affects how water behaves and reacts with other elements. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Types of Chemical Bonds
 
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Types of Chemical BondsRadio electronics professionals and beginners are used to think of an electron as of a certain sphere, or even a part of an electronic device. But as a physical notion, the electron has a much deeper meaning. It is in fact an integral part and component of the matter. Our world consists of chemical bonds. Let's look into the types of chemical bonding out there in more detail. A chemical bond occurs between atoms, which results in formation of molecules, and therefore of substances surrounding us. There exist three types of chemical bonds: an ionic bond, a covalent bond and a metallic bond. A hydrogen bond stands a little aside - it is not exactly chemical, but it does significantly impact the structure of many substances. And now let's discuss each of these bonding types.The ionic bond is formed in such a way that the substances that easily give and except outer shell valence electrons are actually prone to forming such bond. For instance, the sodium atom easily gives away its outer shell valence electron, whereas the chlorine atom readily accepts an electron onto its outer orbital in order to fill it to a certain extent. When they meet, the sodium and the chlorine atoms form such bond, with the electron leaving the sodium atom to join the orbital of the chlorine atom. Thus, sodium becomes positively charged, since one of the electrons is missing, whereas the chlorine atom is negatively charged due to the additional electron. The resulting Coulomb force forms the ionic bond. The sodium and chlorine atoms in themselves are very active, but when they form an ionic bond, they turn into the common salt. The next kind of chemical bonding is the covalent bond. This bonding is one of the fundamental ones in organic chemistry, and in life in general. Covalent bonding can be found in carbonic chains, but they are of course not the only ones that can form covalent bonds. Another covalent bond-based widespread substance that we use in our everyday life is water. In covalent bonding the outer shell electron is not entirely passed from one atom to the other. Instead we can observe a so-called junction. The electrons in such kind of bonding are passed from one atom to the other on a constant basis and at high frequencies. As a result, such electrons are to some extent common, and to some extent divided. The formed electrical bonds are rather strong, which results in formation of a substance. For example, in water the outer shell hydrogen electron joins the outer shell electrons of oxygen and in this way such bond is formed.The third kind of bonding is the metal bonds. If we take it in a reverse order, the ionic bond implies complete transfer of electrons, the covalent one - let's say, partial transfer, and the metallic one - generation of the electron gas. The atoms of metals have one or two very lively electrons on their outer shell that can be easily given away. As a rule, such electrons do not belong to one atom. As a result we get something similar to balloons - metal atoms flowing in the electron gas. This leads to generation of very strong electric forces which tie these atoms together. The metal bonding is exactly the reason why metals are so ductile, because the electrons do not to belong to a single atom, which is why then can be easily moved without inflicting any damage.And, I have already mentioned before, that the hydrogen bond is somewhat different. Being not chemical in nature, it for the most part defines the organic chemistry and our biological life. For instance, if we look at water from the chemical point of view, it should be a gas, but we all know that it's liquid. It is due to such hydrogen bonds, which exist apart from the molecular covalent ones, that water is liquid. Although entirely neutral in itself, a water molecule is polarized. The hydrogen atoms are pushed closer to the oxygen atom. Such polarization, as we can see, leads to generation of intermolecular forces. They are rather weak, on the one hand, but strong enough to make water liquid, instead of gaseous. Atomic bonds are also very important in polymers and organics. For example, a DNA molecule forms a spiral due to the hydrogen bonding. Thus, we have seen that electrons are not only a part of electronics and something used by us in our everyday life, but also a fundamental elementary particle that forms our world.
Views: 5119 ChipDipvideo
Matric part 1 Chemistry, Covalent Bond - Chemistry Chapter 4 - 9th Class Chemistry
 
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ilmkidunya.com has brought to you Lecture of Sibghat Ullah on "9th Class Chemistry Chapter 4 Structure of Molecules. Topic 4.3 Types of Chemical Bond". In this video following sub topics have been taught: - 4.3.2 Covalent Bond For more videos of Sibghat Ullah visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study , https://www.instutor.com This lecture is specially recorded for students of 9th class, 9th class from all Punjab Boards and is based on the current curriculum of study for Chemistry book. All these lectures are conducted in Urdu/English medium to facilitate Pakistani students.
Views: 36597 ilmkidunya
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 724478 Tyler DeWitt
Naming Covalent Molecular Compounds
 
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We'll learn how to write names for compounds that are made of two nonmetals, sometimes called binary compounds. Binary compounds made of two nonmetals are called covalent or molecular because the elements are held together with covalent bonds, and they make molecules. In order to name them, we use the element name for the first element in the chemical formula, and then we use the -ide name for the second name in the chemical formula. Greek prefixes to show the number of atoms of each element, and these are put in front of the element names.
Views: 714617 Tyler DeWitt
Concept at your tips - Ionic and Covalent Bond - ( In Hindi ) - Easy and fast way to learn
 
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in this video you will learn easy and fast way to remember Ionic and covalent bond with a small trick. in this you will also learn what is anion and cation ? please channel ko subscribe karey https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIUatIgOsHrko9SNv_dQczw Please Like and follow us for more update Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/technikclass/ instagram: https://www.instagram.com/technikclasses/
Views: 21315 Technik Classes
Double and Triple  Covalent Bonds
 
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Learn how electrons are formed in a double and triple bond.
Views: 38556 The Science Classroom
Types of chemical bond(ionic bond,covalent bond)
 
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In this lecture I'll tell you about Types of chemical bond(ionic bond,covalent bond).basically there are 4 types of chemical bond namely ionic,covalent,coordinate covalent bond,metallic bond.you will came to know the definition of ionic bond,It's examples,defination of covalent bond it's examples and types single covalent bond,double covalent bond,triple covalent bond. Dear student and fellows subscribe to my channel for getting more information and lectures about chemistry.
Views: 221 Master of Science
Dogs Teaching Chemistry - Chemical Bonds
 
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I am a chemist and my greatest hobby is to train my dogs...why not combine the two?! Paige's facebook- http://www.facebook.com/PaigetheBorderCollie Dexter's facebook - http://www.facebook.com/theDexterDog Contact us! [email protected] Music: "East Side Bar" by Josh Woodward - http://www.joshwoodward.com/ .................................................................................................. Chemical bonds are what hold atoms together. A chemical bond is an attraction between atoms that allows the formation of chemical substances. The electrons that participate in chemical bonds are the valence electrons, which are the electrons found in an atom's outermost shell. An ionic bond is formed when one of the atoms will lose its electron to the other atom. This results in a positively charged ion, called an cation. and negatively charged ion, called an anion. Positive and negative attract! The result is ionic bond. Covalent chemical bonds involve the sharing of a pair of valence electrons by two atoms There are also what is called Polar Covalent Bonds. These are Covalent bonds in which the sharing of the electron pair is unequal. The result is a bond where the electron pair is displaced toward the more electronegative atom.
Views: 1237488 snuggliepuppy
Covalent vs. Ionic bonds
 
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This quick video explains: 1) How to determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons that an atom will comtain. 2) The characteristics of covalent bonds 3) The characteristics of ionic bonds Teachers: You can purchase this PowerPoint from my online store for only $3. The link below will take you to the store. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Covalent-vs-Ionic-Bonds-PowerPoint-2340207 - Atom - Element - Proton - Neutron - Electron - Atomic number - Atomic mass - Covalent - Ionic - O2 - Salt - Sodium chloride
Views: 394975 Beverly Biology
What Are Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about covalent bonds, when learning about properties of matter. When similar atoms react, like non-metals combining with other non-metals, they share electrons. This is covalent bonding. Non-metals have shells of electrons that are normally half or more than half full of electrons. Since they have a strong attraction for a few additional electrons, it is energetically unfavourable for any of them to lose electrons, so they share electrons by overlapping orbitals. This makes a bonding orbital, or covalent bond, that contains two or more electrons. Covalent bonds can be represented by a dot and cross diagram. These diagrams show only the valence electrons. Covalent bonds are directional, which means they are in a fixed position. The overlap between orbitals mean that the atoms in covalent bonds are very close, and make covalent bonds strong. There are two kinds of covalent structure - small molecules, like water, and giant compounds, like diamond. The electrons in the bonds are evenly shared, which means the bonds are not polarised; there is little attraction between molecules, and forces between molecules are weak. Compounds made from small covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points and are volatile. They also don’t conduct electricity. Carbon and silicon tend to form giant covalent compounds. These bond in the same way, but instead of forming small molecules with one or two bonds, they form four, make up huge lattices or chains of many many linked up atoms. Diamond is a common example, and is made up of Carbon. These compounds have very high melting and boiling points because you have to break covalent bonds rather than intermolecular forces to make them free enough to act like liquids or gases. The covalent bonds hold them rigidly in place in the giant lattice. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Oxygen, Nitrogen & Carbon and Covalent Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry tutorial video explains how oxygen, nitrogen & carbon make covalent chemical bonds to school & science students . The video shows how the protons and electron shells, and especially the number of electrons in the outer shells determine how many bonds oxygen, nitrogen and carbon can make. Four important molecules, water H2O, ammonia NH3, and methane CH4 are discussed. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 145828 AtomicSchool
How Does The Bond Nacl Form?
 
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It forms a giant structure which parts of atoms can interact (react) to form chemical bonds? Baby sean underwent sweat chloride test that measures the levels nacl in two major types bonding compounds are covalent and ionic bonds. What is the ionic bond formation of nacl? Sodium chloride, nacl hyperphysics concepts. How does the bond between nacl form sodium chloride garden and plate. Many ionic in nacl, each ion has 6 bonds and all bond angles are 90 degrees. So then, sodium ions will attract chloride and form an ionic bond the other elements in a families on periodic table do gain, lose, or share cation attracts chlorine anion forms compound nacl, bonding is type of chemical that involves electrostatic attraction between many sulfides, e. It's an ionic bond when sodium gives away one electron and chlorine gains this so both can obtain full valencies bonds form atoms transfer electrons between each other, forming ions that are electrically attracted to other a them. Does sodium chloride have an ionic or a covalent bond? Quoramolecules and compounds (article). When put into contact with water, these hydrogen form electrostatic absolutely right that when you dissolve nacl in water the compound does separate ions we're updating subjects as fast we can. Sodium chloride (nacl) is a single ionic bond in sodium can be shown as follows covalent compounds, atoms form bonds that consist of electrons shared between. An atom of sodium has one 3s electron outside a closed shell, and it takes only 5. With the transfer of electron, sodium reacts with chlorine to form na ions and cl in spite fact that a mole atoms is formed by breaking bonds one half if reaction between stops at nacl, why does when an atom it will gain electron from oppositely charged called ionic bond2na(s) cl2(g) arrow 2nacl(s). Sodium chloride is a crystalline ionic compound. Gcse chemistry the reaction between sodium and chlorine chapter 2 flashcards when put into contact with water, these hydrogen form electrostatic absolutely right that you dissolve nacl in water compound does separate ions. Bbc gcse bitesize ionic compounds and bonding. Visit sodium chlorine chloride the animation shows ionic bonds being formed in chloride, is a compound from bonding of and. In cscl ionic bonds don't really exist. For example in solid sodium chloride nac calcium silicate rocks to form carbonate; But living things can also take nacl, chloride, is the simplest and classic of ionic bonds which given it has an bond, molecules by ionisation atoms attraction resulting ions when at least two different elements come together chemical bonds, these be called compounds. Sodium chloride, nacl hyperphysics concepts a url? Q answers. Why does sodium form nacl? . Do form non stoichiometric compounds. Sodium chloride, nacl hyperphysics concepts. Bbc gcse bitesize ionic bonding. How does a bond form between sodium and chlorine in chemical bonds. Sodium chloride (nacl) is a typical ionic compound. What is sodium chlorid
Views: 171 Pan Pan 1
Valence electrons and bonding | Periodic table | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How to get Lewis structures from electron configuration, and how valence electrons are involved in forming bonds. Created by Jay. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/atomic-radius-trend?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/copy-of-periodic-table-of-elements/v/periodic-table-transition-metals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 472241 Khan Academy
Hydrogen Bonds In Water Explained - Intermolecular Forces
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding occurs in molecules when hydrogen is attached to highly electronegative small atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine. Hydrogen bonds are very strong dipole dipole interactions. Molecules that contain hydrogen bonds such as water are very polar. Hydrogen bonds is one of the strongest types of intermolecular forces. This video contains a few examples and illustrations of hydrogen bonds in water and in HF. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/

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